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flyingclay

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You're smoking!

 

With installing the fuel sight gauges, it is a good time to epoxy an LED with a pigtail that can be wired later for a fuel light.  I just dremel a small inverted "U" in the clear part of the site gauge and embed an LED aimed upward. It just needs to shine into the edge of the gauge to work.  Polish the edges of the "U".  Mark the leads so you will get the polarity correct later.  Any old white or red LED will do.  You could do it later but a good time is after the clear guage has been glued on but before the BID surround is added.  I love LEDs.  Low power, no heat, last forever.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Kent,

 

Great idea, I will incorporate this for sure. I just finished taping the seat and bulkheads and the four plies for the canard. I have glassed the inside of the seat support. It looks like a bottomless boat and I am excited to get it covered on the outside. 

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I won't be installing my sight gauges until I am finishing off the inside of the project.  I did have them "In-hand", since I needed the dimensions for making certain they'd fit in my fuselage sides.


Andrew Anunson

I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

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Andrew, I had the same thoughts for mine and did not put in the sight gauges or follow the plans to make the indentations.  The insides glassed much more easily (without that weave-warping indent) and I figure I can retrofit later. 


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Developer & Builder
Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Building Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

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I am also planning on using cozy girl strakes and did not put the indention for the control stick or the indent for the fuel site gauge. I am also wondering about the fuel selector switch, and I am thinking of installing it in front of the throttle quadrant. It would be a visual reminder as well as easier to see. Does anyone have thoughts on this and what selector to buy to go this route. I have not made the bracket for the original installation of the selector and was wondering if I should put the wood reinforcement in the seat support or leave it out if I am not using the plans fuel selector.

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Lots of people have moved the fuel valve.  Google Images for 'cozy Andair fuel valve' and you'll see a couple.  Google images does not capture all the builder site photos;  you'll find more through Marc's cozybuilders.org builder page.  Wayne Hicks is one I can think of offhand.  The Cozy group archives will also bring up discussions.  Try searching 'Andair fuel valve move'

 

Yeah, you could leave out the wood if you want to do that.

 

Think about where you want to put your O2 bottle and make provision for that.  It's nice to be able to get to the valve in flight.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I am also wondering about the fuel selector switch, and I am thinking of installing it in front of the throttle quadrant. It would be a visual reminder as well as easier to see.

http://www.cozy.simpex.com/Ch17_03.html

 

Bernie has documented his installation well (and YES, get valve he lists... its the best fit).  Vans Aircraft has this valve and the best price.


Andrew Anunson

I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

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Andrew, I had the same thoughts for mine and did not put in the sight gauges or follow the plans to make the indentations.  The insides glassed much more easily (without that weave-warping indent) and I figure I can retrofit later. 

Huh?  Not sure we did the same thing here...I did make the indentations for Vance's site gauges.  This would be much more difficult later on... see my attached photo from 10 yrs ago...

post-126595-0-59314800-1495202091_thumb.jpg

post-126595-0-76341300-1495202319_thumb.jpg

Edited by Andrew Anunson

Andrew Anunson

I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

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http://www.cozy.simpex.com/Ch17_03.html

 

Bernie has documented his installation well (and YES, get valve he lists... its the best fit).  Vans Aircraft has this valve and the best price.

Be very careful in choosing a fuel valve and location. You're early in the build, and EFI will be far more common and likely by the time you're ready for an engine (See SDS EFII). Most EFI systems will require a return flow and a 6 port valve, if you want to do it right with two tanks. Edited by Marc Zeitlin

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Be very careful in choosing a fuel valve and location. You're early in the build, and EFI will be far more common and likely by the time you're ready for an engine (See SDS EFII). Most EFI systems will require a return flow and a 6 port valve, if you want to do it right with two tanks.

Yeap, you'll need a 6 port valve if you want EFI... I didn't think of that in my response.

It might be best to install one of those back near the firewall and control it remotely because I don't think it and its plumbing will fit up front.  

 

Reasons I decided against EFI...

a.) a 6 port valve like Marc mentions is required, and I couldn't figure out how to get a 6 port valve mounted up front in the center console

b.) Other than auto mixture control, I found no proven advantages of EFI over FI.  Marc and others have demonstrated that a mechanical FI and electronic ignition combination is very effective at saving fuel, and so far EFI has not been beating the mechanical systems if efficiency.

 

Now, if you believe that we'll be facing emissions testing in the future, EFI could be a part of a emissions reduction.

 

What I learn from Marc's post is that we should see the entire fuel system when selecting a fuel valve.  Of all the systems we can use (carburetor, throttle body, fuel injection, and electronic fuel injection), only EFI requires the duplex valve.


Andrew Anunson

I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

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Marc and others have demonstrated that a mechanical FI and electronic ignition combination is very effective at saving fuel, and so far EFI has not been beating the mechanical systems if efficiency.

If I were building an airplane today, I'd use the SDS EFI/EI system. It WILL allow for better leaning, as you can individually trim each cylinder for maximum efficiency. It is also simpler than Mechanical FI and more reliable. If I didn't already have $$6,500 invested in my FI/EI systems, I'd go with SDS.

 

What I learn from Marc's post is that we should see the entire fuel system when selecting a fuel valve.  Of all the systems we can use (carburetor, throttle body, fuel injection, and electronic fuel injection), only EFI requires the duplex valve.

But since it's the best available system and costs no more than a Mech. EFI and dual EI system, it's definitely worth considering.

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Thanks for all of the input. I am wondering if I should put the fuel selector in the plans position or not? I am at the stage that I will be installing the seat back support and the plans have you make the fuel selector valve mounting point and I would like to have it in a more visible location and would not want to spend the extra time to fabricate the mounting bracket and install the wood reinforcement and cut outs for the plans valve. Can I just leave it out and worry about it at a later date or will this come to bite me later? Will the SDS EFI fuel selector fit in the seat back? Is there a diagram for the plumbing of the SDS EFI system? Will I be able to retrofit this system if I leave it out at this point? Again thanks for all of the feedback and help.

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 I am wondering if I should put the fuel selector in the plans position or not?

Only you can decide if you want to deviate from the plans or not.  Nat would tell you to put the plans valve in the plans location.  I think I'll like my Andair valve better up front, but most Cozy's are built with the valve in the plans location and it is OK.  

 

Can I just leave it out and worry about it at a later date or will this come to bite me later? 

Build it like the plans show until you come up with a new plan.  You can't skip portions of the build if you don't have a really good, thought out, new plan.  So yeah, for now, just build it like the plans show.  It'll teach you to bend aluminum, use rivets and nutplates.  My bracket is in there too... even though my valve is up front.

 

If you KNOW that you won't install a valve in the seatback... then you can skip the bracket.  

 

Will the SDS EFI fuel selector fit in the seat back? Is there a diagram for the plumbing of the SDS EFI system? Will I be able to retrofit this system if I leave it out at this point? Again thanks for all of the feedback and help.

The SDS EFI fuel selector is a 6 port valve which switches both the tank your fuel comes from, and where the fuel is returned to.  Go to the Andair website and check out the FS2020 duplex valve.  This is what you'll be using (or something like it).

 

Will it fit the seatback?  Sure, one way or another you can fit it there.  It won't fit the plans bracket, but you can retrofit it later.

 

I haven't seen any photos posted of one of these duplex valves installed in an EZ or a Cozy.  There are likely some installations, but they haven't been shared with the community.  Marc works on a lot of these planes, perhaps he can share photos of a duplex valve installed in the center console or in the seat back?


Andrew Anunson

I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

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The SDS EFI fuel selector is a 6 port valve which switches both the tank your fuel comes from, and where the fuel is returned to.  Go to the Andair website and check out the FS2020 duplex valve.  This is what you'll be using (or something like it).

Maybe. That's one option. Another is to use a single sump system and a single on-off valve, with a return line only to the sump. Far simpler. Not necessarily recommending it, because it'll involve modifying the vent lines, installing a sump, and other mods too. But the 6-port Andair (not SDS) valve is hardly the only solution. We've had all these discussions about a zillion times on the COZY and Canard-Aviators mailing lists. There are MANY options for valve type mounting and control.

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I just finished the interior layups of the center section spar. I am jumping around a bit because I was missing the aluminum tubes for the seat belt attach points. It took about 6 hours by myself, I used a foam form to install the glass and used nails to attach the glass covered in plastic to the form and it made it tolerable. I had everything ready yesterday so I could get started fresh and with plenty of time. I have  ordered the seat belt tubes and they should be here Tuesday. I am going to install the forward face of the center spar tomorrow and when I get the seat belt attach tube, Ill finish the seat back support and I already have the bottom glassed and ready to fit to the rest of the fuselage. I decided against the standard fuel selector valve and will install one in front of the throttle quadrant. It is coming but not as fast as I would like. Does anyone have tips for doing the spar caps, the shear web layup and the attach points? It is still a few days out but will be happening soon.

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It is coming but not as fast as I would like. 

 

 

I would say you're a rocket, but with no pics, it could all be fiction.   :-)

 

Only thing I'd say on spar caps is to fill the trough but don't build in high-spots.  A pair of tweezers helps for picking the red thread and cross threads out of the UNI tapes.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I have been taking pic but not as many as I probably should. I went to the airport today and I couldn't put the front on the spar because the slow epoxy wasn't fully cured so I went ahead and glassed the inside of the turtleback. This was probably the most painful of all the layups so far. I did it like the plans say and put the form on the ground and instead of using five minute epoxy for the gluing of the foam, I used hot glue. It attached well and I hope it will come out of the mold easily. My back is killing me because of being bent over for the layup and applying the peel ply. 

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OK, I just updated my Facebook page, You can check it out at "Cozy build log" is my name on Facebook and I just added pics up to the center spar, Ill take pics of the turtle back tomorrow when I go to the airport. This should prove it is not fiction. There are even two pics of me holding the fuselage sides with the bulkheads on the floor of the hanger to prove its actually me but I do not take selfies of me and the plane, a friend took those pics. Let me know what you think, thanks.

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Kent,

 

I have been checking out almost every post of Charles cozy, I am also hoping to put a (shhhhhh) rotary as well. Thanks for the link.

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I need to upgrade my epoxy box to Charles' design.  I also need to upgrade my "factory" the same.   :)

 

I wouldn't go with a rotary engine at all unless you're an absolute automotive gear head and that in itself thrills you.  Go with a Lycoming-type engine if you want to get in the air.  Keep that in mind as you have plenty of time to get to that decision.  

 

Here's how I've been told the overall effort breaks down:

  • 1/3 is the airframe
  • 1/3 is the engine, plumbing, electric and avionics
  • 1/3 is paint and finishing

Lots of work and thanks for sharing -- it's motivating!

 

Just my $0.02.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Developer & Builder
Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Building Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

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...I am also hoping to put a (shhhhhh) rotary as well.

 

Get on the Fly Rotary list for information and support that is Wankel specific. (www.flyrotary.com)

You'll never burn a valve by flying lean of peak. .... or throw a rod, or blow a jug, or .....

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I have been checking out almost every post of Charles cozy, I am also hoping to put a (shhhhhh) rotary as well. Thanks for the link.

 

Do your homework.  Marc had a good summary in this thread

http://www.canardzone.com/forum/topic/17790-rotary-simplity-equals-reliability/?p=18850

 

Since then, 

Chris Barber - abandoned his rotary for a Continental

Cozygirrls - building since about '01 and their rotary is not flying yet

John Slade - no offers to buy his Turbo rotary Cozy at $45,000.  I don't know if he sold it.  He made it work but flew it very few hours

Steve Brooks - sold rotary Cozy cheap, buyer is re-engining

 

The web is full of enthusiastic "I'm using a Rotary" writeups.  People are less forthcoming when they never finish their projects, or swap them for airplane engines, or fly very few hours, or can't sell the airplane.  


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Al G. sold his Mazda 20B powered Velocity for $129,000

I don't follow sales much.

 

If you want a Rotary, you'll need to sign-up on one of the rotary aviation lists.

You will not find anything in the way of support here on anything other than Lycoming/Continental and perhaps a couple of other air-cooled solutions,

 

The point is, build what YOU want to fly.

I'm sure you are also aware of www.Mistal-Engines.com as well, yes?

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Excellent points Kent, and I totally agree.  

 

I did see that Perry Mick chimed in on that post.  There have been others with temporary successes, but as you point out it's often transitional.  Personally I would never buy a plane that had a rotary engine in it.

 

Cozygirrls - building since about '01 and their rotary is not flying yet

 

The CozyGirrrls are an exception.  If they want to fly a rotary, they will.  As with everything they do, they do the hell out of it and take their sweet time to get it "perfect" (a curse).

 

Back on point:  If you want to fly later rather than sooner, go with a Rotary engine.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Developer & Builder
Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Building Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

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