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    • Le 13/08/2019 à 19:06, macleodm3 a dit :

      Please learn about nose gear shimmy (where the front wheel wobbles back and forth at a high rate.... like a worn out shopping cart wheel).  I did a google search for "Long-EZ Shimmy" and found the following information (and there is other information out there too.... this is just one example of what to look for).

       

      NOSE WHEEL SHIMMY
      (From CP34, Page 9, October, 1982)

           We have cautioned EZ pilots about nose gear shimmy damper adjustment in the last two Canard Pushers, yet we still have EZs losing their nose wheels.   It is a fact that your nose wheel fork will fail if you experience shimmy on landing or take off.  It is also a fact, that if the friction damper is correctly adjusted, you will not have shimmy at all.  The nose wheel fork will not fail due to a normal landing.  It is very strong, the original fork has been grossly overloaded to the point of failing the NG15A casting and/or the 1/8" aluminum plate on the forward face of the NG15A casting.  Yet the fork was not damaged.  This has occurred several times.  We are satisfied that the fork will fail if it shimmies. Therefore if you keep the friction damper adjusted and check it regularly, you will not have this problem.  Every time you extend the nose gear, just before you get into your EZ, hold the nose wheel clear of the ground and use your foot on the trailing edge of the nose wheel tire to check the friction. You will soon get calibrated. You should have to push or pull 3 to 5 lbs. to pivot the fork.
           When taking off, try to rotate positively, hold it down until you have the proper speed, then rotate smoothly.  Try to keep the nose wheel from touching back down or skipping, this is when shimmy is most likely, at the instant of a light touchdown. The same applies to landing.  Hold the nose wheel off until you are traveling as slowly as possible.  Then let the nose down and hold it down with forward stick. Do not let it skip.  Avoid nose wheel touchdown at very high speed.
           If you follow these simple steps you will minimize any chance of shimmy and therefore the chances of losing a nose wheel.  The prototype Long-EZ still has the original thin wall fork and with over 680 hours, has never experienced any shinny. N26MS has almost 500 hours with probably more take off and landings than the prototype and it too has not had nose gear problems. Dick and Jeana have high time Long-EZ with over 700 hours and also have not had shimmy or nose wheel failures.  There is a lesson here - get into the habit of pre-flighting your nose gear. Keep your friction damper correctly adjusted.

      Thanks, I will check that!

    • Le 13/08/2019 à 18:44, Ron Springer a dit :

      I don't see a fully dimensioned drawing of NG23 in the plans. But, you can remove what you have and use this figure from the plans as a guide. To remove the bolt, you will have to cut a hole in the side of the nose.

      Nose Bushing.png

      Thanks for your help!!

      laurent

    • 7 hours ago, RSD said:

      Plans are very much still for sale from Shirl Dickey, and landing gear is available from Rock at http://www.eraceraircraft.com/

      That is great news!  I was quoting a post from 2009... thank you for correcting my false statements.

      • Like 1
    • On 8/11/2019 at 11:19 PM, macleodm3 said:

      On the e-racer... there will be some issues to overcome.  I may be wrong but I think that plans are not currently for sale and that you also need a set of Long-EZ plans to fill in the blanks because the plans do not include all the details needed.  Major parts, such as landing gear, are no longer available.  Have you tried searches online such as "E-racer vs Cozy" and "E-racer vs Long-EZ"?   There are some good discussions about how to get started with an E-racer project.

      Plans are very much still for sale from Shirl Dickey, and landing gear is available from Rock at http://www.eraceraircraft.com/

      • Thanks 1
    • 3 hours ago, FrenchEz said:

      Hi All,

       I need some help , I bought a VARIEZE and I found some vibrations on the nose landing gear. I need some help. How do you adjust the friction recommended by rutan. Is anybody know where to find the drawing of the nose landing gear bushings.

      thanks 

      laurent 

       

      Please learn about nose gear shimmy (where the front wheel wobbles back and forth at a high rate.... like a worn out shopping cart wheel).  I did a google search for "Long-EZ Shimmy" and found the following information (and there is other information out there too.... this is just one example of what to look for).

       

      NOSE WHEEL SHIMMY
      (From CP34, Page 9, October, 1982)

           We have cautioned EZ pilots about nose gear shimmy damper adjustment in the last two Canard Pushers, yet we still have EZs losing their nose wheels.   It is a fact that your nose wheel fork will fail if you experience shimmy on landing or take off.  It is also a fact, that if the friction damper is correctly adjusted, you will not have shimmy at all.  The nose wheel fork will not fail due to a normal landing.  It is very strong, the original fork has been grossly overloaded to the point of failing the NG15A casting and/or the 1/8" aluminum plate on the forward face of the NG15A casting.  Yet the fork was not damaged.  This has occurred several times.  We are satisfied that the fork will fail if it shimmies. Therefore if you keep the friction damper adjusted and check it regularly, you will not have this problem.  Every time you extend the nose gear, just before you get into your EZ, hold the nose wheel clear of the ground and use your foot on the trailing edge of the nose wheel tire to check the friction. You will soon get calibrated. You should have to push or pull 3 to 5 lbs. to pivot the fork.
           When taking off, try to rotate positively, hold it down until you have the proper speed, then rotate smoothly.  Try to keep the nose wheel from touching back down or skipping, this is when shimmy is most likely, at the instant of a light touchdown. The same applies to landing.  Hold the nose wheel off until you are traveling as slowly as possible.  Then let the nose down and hold it down with forward stick. Do not let it skip.  Avoid nose wheel touchdown at very high speed.
           If you follow these simple steps you will minimize any chance of shimmy and therefore the chances of losing a nose wheel.  The prototype Long-EZ still has the original thin wall fork and with over 680 hours, has never experienced any shinny. N26MS has almost 500 hours with probably more take off and landings than the prototype and it too has not had nose gear problems. Dick and Jeana have high time Long-EZ with over 700 hours and also have not had shimmy or nose wheel failures.  There is a lesson here - get into the habit of pre-flighting your nose gear. Keep your friction damper correctly adjusted.

      Edited by macleodm3
      • Thanks 1
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  • Our picks

    • There's a long history with ongoing discussion about new and coming (and gone) canard aircraft that have been in the works over the years. This thread makes for some interested reading and lessons to be learned.
      • 68 replies
    • We'll be adding a list of curated links to the Canard Zone in the coming weeks, but here are a few in the meantime for your browsing pleasure...
      • 0 replies
    • Here's how I built a couple of props. The first one was good right out of the box--credit beginner's luck. The second one which I will discuss here took a lot of adjusting;  you might find it interesting.  At the outset, I will admit that it's easier to just buy a prop but what fun is that!   There are probably easier ways to draw prop blades with a 3D CAD program but this is was my method.

      1. The first thing is to decide what length and pitch to build. I kept a list of props I read about that a people were using with a given HP and speed range and put them on a spreadsheet. (pic 1) Comparing pitch is tricky because a prop builder might be quoting the pitch of the flat side or the pitch of the prop's chord line. There can be several degrees difference.  I just assumed that every pitch was quoted at the chord line.

      2. Pitch is quoted in inches at the 75% station. It is the geometric distance a prop with no slippage will advance forward in one rotation.  However, a builder must know the chord pitch angle.  My spreadsheet converted pitch-inches into a pitch angle.  I chose 26.8° chord pitch angle for my 180 hp engine and a 67“ length. From some previous experimenting, I believe length is not too critical. Pitch and tip thinness make a big difference.

      3. I used six nice maple boards, 3/4” thick, so the hub thickness would be 4.5”.  I scraped them as recommended to open the pores and glued them together with Weldwood Plastic Resin glue, rolling glue on both surfaces and flipping the growth rings for each board, and clamped them tight for a couple of days. (pic 2) The Weldwood product was recommended because it has a more generous working time than Resorcinol. 

       
      • 23 replies
    • Your correspondent in Concord N.C. reporting:
      I have always been a little suspicious of the plans Long-EZ engine mounting points. No good reason, really. If you use 4130 angles or thicker 2024 angles in the firewall, it seems to hold up fine in service, so no need to do anything much different.
       
      However, I built a Cozy IV and like the way Nat re-designed the engine mounts in the C-IV so I thought I would go that direction. I got a good deal on an 0-320-H2AD. There is no mount or dynafocal ring made that would work, AFAICT--so I bought a dynafocal cup set from ACS to make my own dynafocal ring. Surprise! I thought the cups would come welded-up but you only get the steel--three pieces for each cup--and have to weld them to make the cups. Not too hard to do, though.
       
      I had to start by machining some aluminum substitutes for the dynafocal doughnuts to postion the cups in the correct position. (BTW, a compressed dynafocal doughnut and cup is 2" thick) After that it was a solid 4-5 days of work for me. Goes like that when you have to re-sharpen about a hundred tungstens, find your misplaced spectacles, etc. Seems like I ought to have more tubes but compare it to a C-IV mount from the Cozygirrrls. Mine looks at least as robust as Nat's design which is holding up well. I might add another cross brace at the bottom.
       
      Here are three pics of my mount with the alum spacers I made, a regulation C-IV mount from the Cozygirrrls, and a mount from the internet that might have been for an O-540. That one is stout.
      • 398 replies


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