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macleodm3

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macleodm3 last won the day on May 24

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About macleodm3

  • Rank
    Chapters 22, 23 & 25
  • Birthday 02/25/1973

Flying Information

  • Flying Status
    Not much flying these days... the $$ goes to the Cozy
  • Airport Base
    KLNP

Personal Information

  • Real Name (Public)
    Andrew Anunson
  • Location (Public)
    Wise, VA
  • Occupation
    Mining Engineer
  • Interests
    I've got an awesome family, a fun job, and the best hobby I can imagine.

Project/Build Information

  • Plane
    Cozy Mark IV
  • Plane (Other/Details)
    Well, it has an engine now.
  • Plans Number
    1273
  • Chapter
    22-25

Contact Methods

  • City
    Wise
  • State/Province
    VA

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  1. The EZ family of aircraft are very efficient, and the group that flies them tend to LOVE taking advantage of all available efficiencies. When you properly equip your Lycoming, you can fly lean of peak (LOP) for peak efficiency. Most (perhaps all?) FADEC solutions don't run the engine lean of peak... so as I understand it, its pretty easy for an attentive pilot to run the Lycoming more efficiently than a computer running any engine in an EZ. Now, if you have a computer that can run the engine LOP perhaps it could beat the typical EZ pilot.
  2. My mid-time O-360 came with P-Mags which I removed and sold to an RV builder. There seem to more problems with P-Mags on our pusher canards then on other aircraft designs, and a common problem was that one P-Mag would fire the plugs at the wrong time, causing the engine to produce no power. In a more typical magneto or EI failure, the other ignition keeps you going... but if an ignition fires at the wrong time then you may lose power. To me a loss of timing failure is like losing both ignitions... Some canard fliers do use P-Mags with success... here is a link to how Nick Ugolini cooled his P-Mags on his Long-EZ (which I think he has sold). http://nickugolini.com/blog/?m=201801 Andrew
  3. I see what looks like one of the steel inserts (spar hardpoint) on a part under the wings, on the floor. Pretty sure its the main spar.
  4. Those fuselage parts aren’t used for the Cozy and I would say they have no value. The wings are match drilled to the main spar, and I see the main spar at the bottom of the parts pile in the 1st photo. If the wing/spar work looks good, you might get $1k to $2k
  5. The only cutaway I have seen is the Long EZ.... see attached.
  6. If you buy all new parts, no scrounging, new engine, glass panel... its taking around $100k to build a Cozy MKIV. Its possible to complete one with second hand parts, mid time engine, simple panel for $50k. I don't see how it would cost a whole lot less to build a new Varieze. Metal parts, engine mount, foam, epoxy, avionics, engine.... maybe it could be done for $30k to $40k. Just a guess... but other than being smaller, there are a similar number of parts. You can buy a nice flying Varieze for $15k to $20k. Have it inspected by one of the excellent leaders in our community, and you'll be YEARS and MONEY Way Ahead. If you want to build... then build. If you want to fly an EZ... I recommend buying one.
  7. I think its not all that unusual to scrape up a lower winglet. Its not something we want to see regularly, but I won’t be surprised if I scrape up on of mine someday.
  8. It looks like you could sand off the paint/primer and add two plies of BID... then fill it, sand it, paint it. I would not be concerned with just that, but you really need a pre purchase inspection by someone like Marc Z to see what other issues exist.
  9. There is a 1” diameter hole at each end of the spar... antenna wires and wingtip light wires exit out these holes. These holes are where cabin air freely exits. The holes are protected from weather, so a flapper typically isn’t required.
  10. Are you cutting foam for the bulkhead or metal for your final IP overlay? If an overlay, you should plot out a trial run on paper and then cut it out to check for proper fit before sending it off for cutting. Most of our IP’s can be off a little bit... plenty enough to make a difference.
  11. This CAD file has all the bulkheads... C4TMP.dwg
  12. To address some of your questions: I built most of my Cozy without ever sitting or flying in one. Almost done and it went great. There are no other homebuilt airplane projects or builders anywhere close to me, but the internet support is fantastic and its all you need. These canards are ez to fly... things just occur faster. A secondhand small tabletop fridge with a lightbulb makes a great (free) hot box. Don’t try to incorporate computers or CNC into the build. The plans teach you to handcraft the plane... follow the plans if you ever want to finish. Its very fun and rewarding to build one. CNC only makes sense if you plan to build many planes.
  13. Always heard to get one that has been kept inside and away from the salty coast (wing attach fittings).
  14. Hello David, I've almost finished building my Cozy MKIV.... its a wonderful, huge, awful, life changing project. Total time to build for me is around 3k hours, cutting foam is only around 20 hours total. Its such a miniscule portion of the project. A difficult part of the project is getting some hardware... thankfully the Cozy Girrrls have stepped up and are able to supply us with hardware. It sounds to me like you have some nice machining capabilities, and you'll have an opportunity to build metal parts with your tools and expertise if you want to save money and build hardware yourself (and there is ALOT of hardware in any EZ/Cozy). If you install a non-Lycoming engine, you'll have lots of additional parts to build for your installation... so its good you have machining experience. All Cozy's that fly much have Lycomings (there is 1 excellent Subaru Cozy that flies alot too). These airplanes aren't good for trying out new engines... they land fast and they land poor off field. Hope you decide to build an airplane... consider an RV if you want to be flying in a couple years. Andrew Anunson

The Canard Zone

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