Jump to content
Thanksgiving special: 25% off everything in the store. Use coupon code GLASSGIVING25 until midnight on Monday. ×

Split-Kits


emteeoh

Recommended Posts

Velocity is now offering split kits. I had a little trouble getting details about it once I heard, and its not up on their website, so I thought I'd share the highlights from Ken Baker's email:

 

A word on the winglet kit: the Winglet kit was developed as much as an introductory kit as it was an integral part of the finished aircraft. We feel that offering a winglet kit offers many benefits to the potential Velocity builder as a "first sub-kit." First off, it's a relatively low cost item - so you can get your feet wet and find out if the project is for you without fully committing yourself financially. Beyond that, the construction methods used in building the winglets are easily mastered and are indicative of many of the steps that will be used later on in building the kit. The kit was developed to be as user friendly as possible. We include a Michaels Engineering epoxy ratio pump, all of the epoxy that you will need, fiberglass, pre-hotwired winglet cores, winglet NAV antenna, coaxial cable, micro-balloons, mixing sticks, mixing cups, brushes, an instructional DVD set, Builder's Manual, and a Velocity Logo hat.

 

The sub-kits are broken down for the XL as follows:

1. Winglet Kit: $950

2. Canard Kit: $2900

3. Left Main Wing Kit: $6250

4. Right Main Wing Kit: $6250

5. Fuselage Kit: $24,850

Fuselage Kit Options:

>Retract Landing Gear: $9000

>Fastbuild Fuselage: $9000

>Dash-5 Package: $3500

 

6. Fuel Strake Kit: $5000

 

These prices do not include crating or shipping charges. Each sub-kit price is subject to change at any time. That is, as price increases effect the full kit base price, the sub-kit prices will be adjusted accordingly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow! That's a great deal! Assuming the "options" are add-on costs of another $32K? (from the website). For over $75K I can build a plane that still need an engine, interior, and avionics? :irked:

 

There's lots of unfinished planes needing a home out there if you want to speed up your build time on a budget. Or check out the price of an allready build used LongEZ for less first if you want a canard to fly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They aren't additive to the base kit, and they've technically been available since Oshkosh. So, if you didn't want a fastbuild retract Dash 5, you could get out for 47,150 (just a slight premium over buying the whole kit outright). Admittedly that's still too steep for some folks, but that's what it is.

 

Also, they will be offering side sticks before Sun-n-Fun apparently.

---

Brett Ferrell

Velocity XL/FG

Cincinnati, OH

http://www.velocityxl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think most velos are built with a centre stick and the throttle quadrant on the pilot's left, which means the co-pilot cannot completely fly the plane on his own. To address that, some builders are doing side sticks and moving the throttle quadrant to the centre of the plane, or you can buy the yoke option and move the throttle to the centre of the plane. I understand that the new option from the "factory" is basically a riff on a builder's design, but don't quote me on that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brett,

Being a Velo guy, do you find an advantage of the side stick over the center stick or vise/versa? Seems build-wise the center stick is a good way to go.

 

Not a Velo guy, however that never stopped me from velocitizing my fingers on the keypad.....

 

If you will be flying IFR or anything that requires writing, you will find that if you have to copy a clearance, or do any writing, the center stick is a pain in the side since you have to either put the plane on A/P or reach over with your left hand to control the stick and jot down your message with your right hand. (assuming that you are not left handed in which case--- NEVER MIND)

 

I had a center stick in my d-fly, and that was one of the big unchangable mistakes that I made with the airplane.:mad:

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brett,

Being a Velo guy, do you find an advantage of the side stick over the center stick or vise/versa? Seems build-wise the center stick is a good way to go.

Aside from writing (you can learn to jot notes with your left hand! on a kneeboard), the center stick is quite nice. Working the radios lefthanded is not even a problem, really.

 

The side-stick has the clear advantage that there are two, so transition training or split-pilot duty has a more reassuring feel, but our test pilot/transition dude-extraordinaire (Dave Bertram) had no trouble palming the top of the center stick to get the plane (and us) to do what he wanted.

 

The side sticks and the door and elbow rests are always a bit tricky, but can be worked out, but you must push them in to enter/exit without removing your love handles. Also, many of the solutions (haven't seen the full factory solution) have a torque tube running across behind the radios which takes up a bunch of room, especially with the candy-cane pitch trim spring in there.

http://www.velocityxl.com/phpBB2/files/IMG_7030_985.jpg

 

B

---

Brett Ferrell

Velocity XL/FG

Cincinnati, OH

http://www.velocityxl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another comment on controls.

1) The Velocity check out plane has a nice set up that I'll likely duplicate at some point. They have duplicate throttle/prop push/pull on the far right side of cabin. Takes no room, easy to cable and gives sufficient control from right hand side. On the stick, they have a small bracket mounted on the standard stick just below the hand grip. This has a duplicate "handle" at an angle on the co-pilot side. The co-pilot handle looks like a bicycle grip (no PTT, etc) and reminds me of the right hand side of the Zenith Y grip.

2) The Velocity (even the SE) is very stable, and roll is easily controlled with rudder pedals only. You can easily enter a turn or hold a turn with rudders only. You can fly for many minutes without touching a control if you have her trimmed up correctly. As long as your trim isn't out of whack, you can easily take notes and make any needed corrections with the rudders to control roll (which can be affected by unbalanced fuel). Also, with AP controls on the stick, jotting a clearance is nothing more than a button push. That said, I've not done anything more than IFR training, so YMMV.

 

All in all, I love the center stick. It is easily modified to allow dual control, makes handling a breeze, and problem with right handers (like me) taking notes has simply been a non-issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another comment on controls.

1) The Velocity check out plane has a nice set up that I'll likely duplicate at some point.

All in all, I love the center stick. It is easily modified to allow dual control, makes handling a breeze, and problem with right handers (like me) taking notes has simply been a non-issue.

 

I have no horse to ride in this race, since I have ridden both right and left handed horses and have made my decision based on these ridings.

 

It is only human nature to be a subscriber to that which you own and use any rationalization to justify that position, be it, in this case either left or right (center) stick.

 

Now for those of you who occasionally fly a store bought aircraft with a yolk, be honest with yourself--- which hand do you typically grip the yolk with???

If it is a stick driven beast, which hand do you typically put on the Johnson.

 

Now, if you were designing an aircraft from the ground up, where would you really put the stick???

 

There is nothing wrong with either left or center stick, the only question is what compromises up with which you are willing to put (either way).

 

IF stick location is a given in your design, and you don't want to change it, it is really a non-issue, and basically you have to conform to what you are given.

 

Stick that in your craw:bad:

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now for those of you who occasionally fly a store bought aircraft with a yolk, be honest with yourself--- which hand do you typically grip the yolk with???

I find that I have a hard time gripping the yolk - it generally drips out of the shell and into the pan. Now, the yoke, I hold onto with my left hand, for the most part, and manipulate the throttle with my right.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now for those of you who occasionally fly a store bought aircraft with a yolk, be honest with yourself--- which hand do you typically grip the yolk with???

I'm right handed, but I fly Left handed exclusively. The Right hand is for the throttle. If I did anything else, my CFI would pull the throttle on me. About the only time I remember using my right hand would be during power-on stalls or flaring. At which point the yoke is back to your gut and need an extra hand to pull and/or make sure the yoke stayed level.

 

It works for me. It's just like opinions and butt-holes. Everyone has one, some stink, some don't.

 

 

If it is a stick driven beast, which hand do you typically put on the Johnson.

You've got to just grin and bear it Rich

and what you two do in the privacy of your own home is your own business!! :P

 

 

BTW, MARC, that was funny.

Drew Chaplin (aka the Foam Whisperer)

---

www.Cozy1200.com - I'm a builder now! :cool:

---

Brace for impact...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:confused: .... It's pretty much dictated by the aircraft. Most certified aircraft put the throttle quad in the center which means you will be using the right hand for throttle/mixture and left for the eggs ..... I mean Yoke. If you cross your arms when flying a certified airplane .......... well, I wouldn't be letting you use my radial arm saw.

 

My Long-EZ will be just the opposite.

T Mann - Loooong-EZ/20B Infinity R/G Chpts 18

Velocity/RG N951TM

Mann's Airplane Factory

We add rocket's to everything!

4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 14, 19, 20 Done

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find that I have a hard time gripping the yolk - it generally drips out of the shell and into the pan. Now, the yoke, I hold onto with my left hand, for the most part, and manipulate the throttle with my right.

Marc,

 

it would take someone eggcentric like you to catch that. Glad you are still awake.

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it would take someone eggcentric like you to catch that. Glad you are still awake.

Yep, but he cured me of the Hangar / Hanger mistake before I started getting caught myself. I try to learn from other peoples mistakes. I'm eggstatic that Marc is willing to share his wisdom here.

Drew Chaplin (aka the Foam Whisperer)

---

www.Cozy1200.com - I'm a builder now! :cool:

---

Brace for impact...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, but he cured me of the Hangar / Hanger mistake before I started getting caught myself. I try to learn from other peoples mistakes. I'm eggstatic that Marc is willing to share his wisdom here.

 

I shell agree with you about Marc's willingness to share his knowledge and himself with the group, although sometimes he eggsasserbates some latent hostilities in some of the lurkers. all in all, he is a good egg.

 

 

I will take my eggsit now

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I shell agree with you about Marc's willingness to share his knowledge and himself with the group, although sometimes he eggsasserbates some latent hostilities in some of the lurkers. all in all, he is a good egg.

 

Naw, sometimes he's just eggnostic.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is only human nature to be a subscriber to that which you own and use any rationalization to justify that position, be it, in this case either left or right (center) stick ... [skip all egg jokes] ...

Now, if you were designing an aircraft from the ground up, where would you really put the stick???

 

It is funny how you can completely miss something that to which you've become accustomed. This is a good, and valid, catch. While I love my center stick, I guess I'd REALLY love to have left/right sticks. While making ingress / egress more of an issue, and giving up the great comfort of having you arm comfortably resting on the keel rest, I'd live with it for the convenience of being able to left hand the stick. That said, I would never consider the center stick to be an issue of any real merit (my experience being considered appropriately).

 

Jeff

 

PS - Most of this is moot, since there are only a couple of things in life better than flying your own canard - side stick, yolk ;^), left/right stick or center stick. I didn't even build mine and I feel this way. I'm truly envious of those of you who committed the time and resources to build your own - I can't imaging what the experience must be like for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, it's funny because my wife has gotten so comfortable right-hand stick and left throttle that she flies from the right seat when we rent something any more.

 

Brett

 

as do many CFIs...

 

I still have trouble writing with my left hand.

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information