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didn't know I needed a really expensive tool to do what my Dremel did pretty cheaply. <g>

That's good to know -- I actually prefer, for the time being at least, acquiring the minimum amount of tools I absolutely need.

 

Chris/everyone, I have to cut through 12 layers of cured glass tomorrow. Will the Dremel and the 542 wheel cut it? Or is now a good time to get myself a Rotozip? Here's where I contradict myself -- I will buy whatever tool I need to cut through this stuff straight and fast.

 

If the answer is FEIN, do let me know, but what then should I do in the meantime between now and Father's Day? I suppose I could always start the IP bulkhead.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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Get the Fein.

 

Straight, Fast, Minimal dust, and my personal favorite - safe.

 

Both the the Rotozip and the Dremel will kick up tons-o-pleasant teeny tiny particles of glass to fill your skin pores. Also, the edges will look kind of raggety. Even more so on thicker layups.

 

No.... I don't own stock in Fein. But, I may name my next illegitimate child after them. :D


"I run with scissors."

Cozy MKIV N85TT

Phase One Testing

http://home.earthlink.net/~jerskip

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That blade on the dremel, or the cutter WILL do all the cutting needed for the whole plane and you don't actually NEED the Fein. Of course you'll spend the cost of the Fein in vacuum cleaner filters and dust masks!

 

I've never needed to replace the bearings or brushes, just the variable speed control!

 

I'd use it, but watch the dust. I didn't buy my Fein until after chapter 10. It does take some getting used to, but it's considerably a nice tool that I shouldn't have waited, but budget was a consideration until we sold a house.

 

I looked at a few things in aircraft building between different types: Metal guys spend a small fortune on tools to make it possible and/or easier. Jerry bought a welder for the limited metal parts we use (and I'm sure much more also long-term). A $200 tool and $50 blade appears to make a huge difference? Why not! I'm not spending $3,000-5,000 on metal-working tools - My overall tool crib is probably about $1500 now of decent tools. They've built 90% of an airplane! :) That's a good return on investment!

 

Jerry mentions "safe" - it's considerably safer than even the dremel, no spinning parts!

 

 

/dan


/dan

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I tested the Dremel 542 blade (tungsten carbide) last night as well as the 545 (diamond wheel, see attached).

 

The diamond wheel is slightly better than the carbide wheel, and being thinner throws less dust. However, I found both to be less than desirable for cutting through 12 layers of cured glass. Both were great for 3 layers, but the 12 cumulative on F28 reminded me of using the basic cut-off wheel on 3 layers. Contrary to a prior post I made, both wheels wanted to kick back at times on the thick sections.

 

At this point I am willing to buy the Fein if I can find out how well it will do many layers of cured glass from Jerry or JD.

 

Happy Father's Day!

post-386-141090153618_thumb.jpg


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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At this point I am willing to buy the Fein if I can find out how well it will do many layers of cured glass from Jerry or JD.

 

Happy Father's Day!

 

Jon,

 

Let me put it this way: I was able to cut through the 50 (or 100 is it?) layers of glass when I was making my landing gear tabs. Make sure when you get the Fein that you get the HSS blade. Its circular in shape with teeny tiny teeth all the way around it. You'll never regret it. (Besides, I just used it to install my over the stove microwave. It sure comes in handy. :) )


"I run with scissors."

Cozy MKIV N85TT

Phase One Testing

http://home.earthlink.net/~jerskip

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John DiStefano stopped by this weekend with his Fein Multimaster to show me firsthand how it does against 12 layers of glass. After using the tool myself I am dead set on getting one so that I never need to wait for the partial cure stage to trim ever again.

 

Amazon has a special going for Father's Day -- save $50 on a Tools order over $250 -- that I'm going to take advantage of. I'm looking to get the non-variable speed version and a couple HSS blades.

 

I still expect to use the Dremel and my new wheels, just not on cutting the monster layups.

 

Thanks everyone!


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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hi Jon

 

I looked at the air powered tool and allthough it is smaller and lighter and cheaper, I am worried aboul possible oil contamination on the workpiece. I think the electrical unit is the right tool. I have tried high speed cutters before. I will be buying a Fein variable speed soon

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Hennie, the only real reason I was considering air-powered tools was that I was pondering the use of carbon fiber. The problem with that is when the little bits get into your motor and on your hand, you can short your motor as well as give yourself a good shocking.

 

I have since realized that this was a weak premise for equipping myself with another $2,000 worth of tools. I didn't think about oil contamination, which makes me even more in favor of the electric version.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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I have used the Fien tool for about 5 years, and wouldnt ever consider building a plane without one. It is a MUST HAVE. Get the HSS blade, but if you can find one, get the circular blade which looks like a piece of it has been wacked off. Years ago, I dropped mine and broke part of the circular blade off. Best thing I have ever done. A circular blade does not cut into flat corners and youll need to be able to cut up to a flat or veritical surface. The last time I went to the wood store, I found they now make a blade exactly like the one that I broke... imagine that.

 

I have used mine to cut the gear legs off (1" thick of S glass), formica, wood, plexiglass, my propellor, kevlar, carbon and of coarse fiberglass.


Regards, Nick

___________________________________

Charleston, SC LongEZ, N29TM, 2400 hrs

http://www.canardzone.com/members/nickugolini/

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I'm having a Fein Father's Day, and am going to have a Fein vacation next week, and then will get back to some Fein building the week following.

 

My wife ordered the single-speed Fein and a Stabila electronic level for me today (she actually just pushed the Order button).


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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After ordering my Fein and level, I went on vacation, which seemed to take some momentum away from me (gotta blame something). Anyway, back in action now building the landing gear bulkheads, although with some major modifications.

 

I did the 22-BID hardpoint layups over 2 days, totalling what seemed to be 5+ hours. At the end, I had a very hard 8.5" x 16.25" plate of glass. I marveled at it, wondering what someone would pay for it. Didn't matter, as it seemed worth too much to part with.

post-386-141090152495_thumb.jpg


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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...wondering what someone would pay for it.

Per the FAQ at www.cozybuilders.org, some have purchased G10 "plastic" instead of fabricating the hardpoint material. Curious, I looked up 2 vendors:

 

Polymer Plastics Corp would sell me a custom-cut sheet for $59.

 

American Micro Industries would sell me a 3' x 4' sheet for $534, where I would have an extra 11 AeroCanard-sized plates or 16 Cozy-sized sheets left over.

 

Perhaps an enterprising individual could add 'Cozy Hardpoints' to their product line, and buy the AeroCanard molds while they're at it. :rolleyes:


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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Per the FAQ at www.cozybuilders.org, some have purchased G10 "plastic" instead of fabricating the hardpoint material. Curious, I looked up 2 vendors:

Or you can call your local plastic supply house and rummage through their scrap bin and probably find what you need for $5.

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Attached is a pic of my hardpoints in action. Also attached is last night's distraction (nothing to do with planes, other than it made my wife happy).

 

The brown spots you see on one of the LG bulkheads are just cured epoxy from the other side. I just sanded rough and put the layups over it. It doesn't look good, but is fine structurally.

post-386-141090152521_thumb.jpg

post-386-141090152524_thumb.jpg


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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I finally have my own Web site to bore everyone at a whole new level! This is my first ever personal site, with a progress report topic here: http://www.canardzone.com/members/JonMatcho/chap_04.htm This represents 30 minutes of sanding from the most recent pic here.

 

Going forward I'm going to put content over there, and just use the forum as a place to discuss my inefficiencies, etc.

 

However, I do want everyone to feel more than welcome to open up their own thread to begin a discussion of their own progress. Use this forum however you like.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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Lookie what cured fiberglass can do to a router bit (notice the 2 notches where the glass burned through the bit):

 

Posted Image

 

I thought I'd breeze through cutting in a 45 degree angle to finish off my LG bulkheads, but laws of physics reared their head. Nothing some good ol' fashioned sanding couldn't handle.

 

I'm also setting out to do my instrument panel, and after tracing I can't believe how tight the leg area looks. I might sand and contour a bit more agressively here to get an extra 1/4" on each side. :rolleyes:


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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hi i looked up your sight but no grouth,i'm on ch 13 -14 have you a boat yet ?


Steve M. Parkins

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No major Cozy progress to report other than getting my shop upgraded to be heated and have new space. I'm in a mission to purge the big junk from my house, and spent the fall on home improvement projects.

 

I have this shop heater waiting to be installed. Hopefully I can get my friend over here to help.

 

The withdrawal symptoms are becoming painful...


Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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When you need to insulate your garage, have it blown in, don't take all the sheetrock down. It's much easier to fix the small hole at the bottom and top every 16" than to rehang, retape, and resand all that sheetrock. I'm just starting my Cozy as well, and it's apparent to me that before it is down I'll have had PLENTY of sanding!

Mark

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When you need to insulate your garage, have it blown in, don't take all the sheetrock down. It's much easier to fix the small hole at the bottom and top every 16" than to rehang, retape, and resand all that sheetrock.

A friend has been pushing me that way as well, but I think I'm still going to rip most of it down. I plan to add a 1" strip of wood to the studs so that I can put higher R-value insulation in there. New doors as well, and the heater is being installed... in January I hope (just have to get same friend to help me through tapping into my gas line.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Canard Zone Member & Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Long-term:  Building a Cozy Mark IV

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.... but I think I'm still going to rip most of it down. I plan to add a 1" strip of wood to the studs so that I can put higher R-value insulation in there. New doors as well, and the heater is being installed...

John,

If you are thinking of taking down most of the drywall and adding a 1" furring strip" I recommend you take it all down and only insulate the stud cavities at their current depth. THEN add a layer of 1" extruded styrofoam insulation panel in front of the studs without the furring strips. When you put up the new drywall just use longer drywall screws/nails. This arrangement gives you the advantage of increased insulation rating, improved insulation performance (yes rating and performance are quite different things) and the styrofoam panel eliminates the thermal bridge that would exist in the case of using the described 1" furring strips.

 

Have a "cozy" hanger in more ways than one!!

 

Good Luck,

Carl

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Jon,

 

Oops I hit submit too fast. :o The best stud cavity insulation to use is the spray-in expanding foam insulation. If you fill the stud cavities with this foam, level it off and then add the 1" extruded styrofoam panel in front of the wall studs and spray-in foam you'll be able to heat your hanger in the dead of winter with little more than a candle so to speak.

 

Remember to make sure your doors are insulated as well because after insultating the walls properly they would then represent the largest source of heat loss.

 

Hey I want a hanger like this!! :envy:

 

Cheers

Carl

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The best stud cavity insulation to use is the spray-in expanding foam insulation. If you fill the stud cavities with this foam, level it off and then add the 1" extruded styrofoam panel in front of the wall studs and spray-in foam you'll be able to heat your hanger in the dead of winter with little more than a candle so to speak.

How much does this cost? I realize the savings in heating will be large, but this is a garage. It's hard to tighten up a garage to be that efficient.

 

I was just pricing insulation for my garage, and found that I can insulate the rear and side wall for about $100 with R-13 fiberglass batting. The front wall is 90% garage door, and the remaining bits are already insulated and covered with plywood.

 

I know that R-13 isn't that good, so I would top it with R-6.5 foil-faced foam insulation. This will cost and additional $225 to get walls with a rating of R19.5, for a total cost of approximately $325 (plus tax). What is the rating of the expanding foam for 2x4 cavities? How much does it cost per square foot of coverage? How easy is it to apply at near-freezing temperatures?

 

I am truly curious, because if it is a better option, then I want to pursue that instead. I haven't even gotten to the ceiling, where I expect to loose the most heat.

 

-- Len


-- Len Evansic, Cozy Mk. IV Plans #1283

Do you need a Flightline Chair, or other embroidered aviation accessory?

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Len,

 

You'd have to check with a local insulation contractor as to actual cost as of course it varies by region. I would expect that installed it will be twice what bat insulation costs and it is usually appied by an insulation contractor, unless a local building centre rents the equipment to apply it yourself. I think it would be more hassle than it is worth to do it by yourself though. The "pros" could do a standard sized double garage in not much more than an hour once they had the equipment going.

 

The spray foam insulation R-value is about 20-25% higher than bat insulation but where it really pays off is in the fact that it insulates AND seals the cavity against air ingress AND fully fills the cavity. I will work it's way in behind electrical boxes, around wiring and into the crevises that usually allow air infiltration. I believe some juridictions even allow you to dispence with vapour barrier because it is so effective. (Check your local codes before building/remodelling.)

 

Hopefully you have an insulated garage door, if not get some extruded panels and apply them against the inside. They won't be as effective as an insulated door but they will be better than the R2-3 that an uninsulated door provides. It would also be usefull to "cocoon" the garage door with vapour barrier sealed all around the adjacent walls and floor for the coldest periods of winter.

 

Just a few thoughts, hope they help.

 

Cheers

 

Carl

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