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kevkevkel

LW 15472 mechanical fuel pump

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I have an Lycoming 0-320 and want to install a mechanical fuel pump

(LW15472). The engine is machined to accept the pump. I have been told that it is very important to install the arm of the fuel pump correctly but have no instructions. Can anyone provide advice and instruction please.

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Carb or Fuel Injection?


T Mann - Loooong-EZ/20B Infinity R/G Chpts 18

Velocity/RG N951TM

Mann's Airplane Factory

We add rocket's to everything!

4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 14, 19, 20 Done

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I have an Lycoming 0-320 and want to install a mechanical fuel pump

(LW15472). The engine is machined to accept the pump. I have been told that it is very important to install the arm of the fuel pump correctly but have no instructions. Can anyone provide advice and instruction please.

You said O-320 so it is carburated. the 15472 is a low pressure diaphram pump for a carburator. does the engine have the fuel pump plunger installed in the accessory case. if you take off the cover there will be a rod about 3/8" diameter hanging down from the top of the opening if not you will have to install one which requires the removal of the accessory case.

Evolultion Eze RG -a two place side by side-200 Knots on 200 HP. A&P / pilot for over 30 years

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Lynn ..... question for you:

I don't have ANY experience with a mechanical fuel pump in an aircraft engine.

 

That said, I had a REALLY BAD experience with one in an automotive engine. The diaphram developed a leak and allowed fuel to pass into the crank case diluting the oil. You can guess the rest.

 

Does this possibility exist in a Lycoming or Continental engine using a mechanical fuel pump?


T Mann - Loooong-EZ/20B Infinity R/G Chpts 18

Velocity/RG N951TM

Mann's Airplane Factory

We add rocket's to everything!

4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 14, 19, 20 Done

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Lynn ..... question for you:

I don't have ANY experience with a mechanical fuel pump in an aircraft engine.

 

That said, I had a REALLY BAD experience with one in an automotive engine. The diaphram developed a leak and allowed fuel to pass into the crank case diluting the oil. You can guess the rest.

 

Does this possibility exist in a Lycoming or Continental engine using a mechanical fuel pump?

No, there is a safety diaphram in between the pump and crankcase with a drain line connection which is piped overboard. the pump is also lower then the connection to the engine. overboard line is the one on the top. this is one on an RV

post-4759-141090169721_thumb.jpg


Evolultion Eze RG -a two place side by side-200 Knots on 200 HP. A&P / pilot for over 30 years

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Thanks .... I learned something new today.


T Mann - Loooong-EZ/20B Infinity R/G Chpts 18

Velocity/RG N951TM

Mann's Airplane Factory

We add rocket's to everything!

4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 14, 19, 20 Done

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As I recall from having changed my fuel pump some time ago, the pump arm is actuated by a shaft inside the accessory case that moves up and down. When you remove the pump, the shaft can slide down a little. If you jam the pump arm in to the left or right of the shaft and you'll know it because the pump base will not tighten down evenly and the pump will be cocked.

 

All you have to do it insert the pump arm angled down initially so that it contacts the end of the shaft, and pushes it up against the cam. Then tighten the mounting bolts evenly without letting the pump get cocked. If the pump base mates to the mount base evenly, you've done it right.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Thank you for responding. Engine is a carbureted 0-320. Plunger is in place. Lycoming overhaul manual says to "make sure pump drive plunger is all the way up", as you advise, but manual also says to "make sure that the cam of the gear is on the low side".

 

I can move it up a half inch or so with my finger but can I be sure that it is all the way up? Do I need to rotate the engine? (I'm have been reluctant to do this as the engine has been overhauled and not yet in service and the general advice is not to turn over engine to avoid scraping lubricant off the cylinder walls to avoid corrosion intrusion).

 

How do I know that the cam of the gear is on the low side - I cannot see anything in there only the plunger?

 

Thank you and sorry for delay in coming back to check on responses.

 

Kevkevkel

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I wouldn't be reluctant to rotate the engine. The engine camshaft is probably covered with assembly lube which is not going to be wiped away easily.

 

AFAIK, you can only tell when the shaft is up (cam at the low point) by feeling it with your finger.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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ALSO;

 

The shaft can sometimes slide back down. Take a little axel grease and whip it on the shaft. this should keep the shaft from falling down, giving you time to put the pump on.

 

Waiter


F16 performance on a Piper Cub budget

LongEZ, 160hp, MT CS Prop, Downdraft cooling, Full retract

visit: www.iflyez.com

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