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Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

I have come across a partially completed Cozy MK IV for sale. I was in the process of beginning work on a different composite craft, but this seems like a good deal, so I'm somewhat side-tracked.

 

Could anyone give me some pointers on what to check to see if this partial is worth getting? Can I check square, plumb, twist, etc.? The wings are complete, the winglets and canard complete and the fuse is about 75% and on wheels.

 

I would appreciate any suggestions you might have to verify this plane is either well-built, or run for your life.

 

Thanks!

dblue

Boise

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Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Could anyone give me some pointers on what to check to see if this partial is worth getting? Can I check square, plumb, twist, etc.? The wings are complete, the winglets and canard complete and the fuse is about 75% and on wheels.

These are all good items to check. I purchased a project which was about 1000 hrs. along. Fuselodge on gear, canard and spar complete. Together the seller and I worked on the wings and winglets at his shop. This gave me invaluable insight as to his workmanship and taught me how to work the materials. I don't know your skill level, but this worked out extreamly well. Anyway...

 

The ideal thing would be to get someone who is building or has built one to look at the project. The seller should have no problems with this if his/her workmanship is in order. I was unable to have this happen and have since come across a few (minor) issues.

 

Do you have the plans and all updated newletters? Are the plans included? Be sure to check that he has made all of the mandatory changes as published in the newsletters. The seller of my project missed the mandatory removal of foam around the spar attach notch (newsletter 80?) so I have a little work to do there.

 

Ask about any mods he has made. Forward hinge canopy, electric landing brake, electric nose wheel? What brakes has he used? The list could go on and on... Is there enough left to qualify for the "51%" rule.

 

Good luck to you, I hope this has helped.

 

Jack Fairchild

working on canopy...

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One of the best things to do is to find an experienced Cozy (or EZ) builder to inspect the project. Find out what the serial number of the plans used and make sure the proper updates have been completed.

 

If you have to go back and retrofit anything that will likely take more time.

Nathan Gifford

Tickfaw, LA USA

Cozy Mk IV Plans Set 1330

Better still --> Now at CH 9

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Is there enough left to qualify for the "51%" rule.

 

Good luck to you, I hope this has helped.

 

Jack Fairchild

working on canopy...

 

If the original builder was not a commercial venture, regardless of what you paid him/her for it, you will qualifiy for the 51% rule. In effect, the rule says that 51% must be built by a non-comercial entity. You may have to prove to the FAA that you have the proper knowledge of construction to obtain your repairman's certificate for that plane.

 

Make acquisition of the prior builder's log and pictures part of the sales agreement. Without them, you will have a lot of splaining to do to the FAA

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

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Don't confuse the "Amateur Built" class with the "Repairman's Certificate".

 

As posted by others, As long as you have photos or some type of documentation/evidence that the plane was built by "amateurs", you'll get it certified in the "Amateur Class"

 

If you apply to the FAA for the "Repairman's Certificate" then you must show evidence that you manufactured the majority of the aircraft (51%). The Repairman's Certificate allows you to sign off the Conditional Inspections (annual) for this particular aircraft ONLY. (regardless if you are the owner or not)

 

Waiter

F16 performance on a Piper Cub budget

LongEZ, 160hp, MT CS Prop, Downdraft cooling, Full retract

visit: www.iflyez.com

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If the original builder was not a commercial venture, regardless of what you paid him/her for it, you will qualifiy for the 51% rule. In effect, the rule says that 51% must be built by a non-comercial entity. You may have to prove to the FAA that you have the proper knowledge of construction to obtain your repairman's certificate for that plane.

Before this gets too far away from the facts, let me state for the record that there is no "51% rule". There's just no such thing. No place in the FAR's is the number 51% mentioned with respect to amateur built experimental aircraft. The rule says that the "majority" of the aircraft must be built by builders for "education and/or recreation".

 

There is also no rule that states that any one person must build the majority of the aircraft (or 51% of the aircraft) in order to get the Repairman's Certificate for that aircraft. If 10 people build an airplane, and each do 10% of the work, ONE of them can get the RC for the plane.

 

Folks, all this info (and more) is on the EAA's web pages. Let's not spread disinformation.

 

Make acquisition of the prior builder's log and pictures part of the sales agreement. Without them, you will have a lot of splaining to do to the FAA

This, and the advice to get an experienced composite canarder to inspect the project before purchase, is good advice.
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Before this gets too far away from the facts, let me state for the record that there is no "51% rule"...rule says that the "majority" of the aircraft must be built by builders for "education and/or recreation"...no rule that states that any one person must build the majority of the aircraft (or 51% of the aircraft) in order to get the Repairman's Certificate for that aircraft...Folks, all this info (and more) is on the EAA's web pages...

Another enlightenment. Marc can you post a link or tell us where to look for that on EAA webpages?

 

Thanks,

Nathan Gifford

Tickfaw, LA USA

Cozy Mk IV Plans Set 1330

Better still --> Now at CH 9

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Another enlightenment. Marc can you post a link or tell us where to look for that on EAA webpages?

 

Thanks,

You need to be a member:

 

http://members.eaa.org/home/homebuilders/

 

There are numerous articles on all phases of homebuilding.

 

If you're not a member, you should be.

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Marc,

 

Thanks for your link. Here's another one I found after searching from the one you gave me: 51 % Rule.

 

It says what you have been saying. However, it does appear that if you assume a project you may have more to prove to the DAR to get your repairman's certificate. This is probably because you did not build all of the aircraft so there may be room to question whether the builder has the requiste skills for a condition inspection.

 

One other highlight is the importance of getting a complete set of builder's logs. I am assuming that the more the project is complete before the transfer, the more important the previous builders' logs are.

Nathan Gifford

Tickfaw, LA USA

Cozy Mk IV Plans Set 1330

Better still --> Now at CH 9

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