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cncdoc

Cozy on a shoestring.....

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I was raised in Indianapolis Indiana and lived close to the Indy 500 track in Speedway. As a matter of fact, my address WAS Speedway Indiana. You can't beathe the air in May without smelling "The Race" in that part of the country! It's that time of the year again and from Florida, I can still smell it!

I have to look back though, on the early 60's through the mid 70's at Indy when a less "corporate" feel dominated the track and the race car owners and drivers. Nowadays, the cars are worth millions and the driver hasn't seen the cars till practice! If it gets wrecked, they have a half dozen others to take it's place.

Twas not always thus...

Do you remember when:

Jim Hurtibuse drove his "Mallard" with the Offy engine, a hollowed out nose cone with a cooler inside, (with beer in it, chillin')?

They had a turbine that blew the snot out of the recip engines?

Car drivers actually built their cars?

Someone drove a car with a "Novi" engine?

If you remember the above you are at least 40 years old... :(

 

What's this got to do with building a Cozy?

 

Well, back when they allowed it, an average Joe could build a car and enter it into the race. If they didn't have a lot of money and they mortgaged their house or something to finish the car in time for the race, they barely made it. The driver/owner drove his heart out to qualify, and then it was driver against driver and car against car. It was more exciting and personal. A victory was more than just winning a race.

Every year, one of these underfinanced entries was dubbed "Indy on a shoestring" It was all they could afford to just get the car into the race. No frills. This doesn't mean that the car was poorer quality than the few corporate sponsored cars, in fact, many mechanics and car designers were given jobs as crew chiefs etc. later as a result of their work and reputation.

 

So how about you?

Are you drooling over a "glass panel" ?

JD's retractable gear is what you crave, but your wallet is slammed shut on the idea?

Does even the electric nose wheel seems a little steep, but the hand crank idea has been been put down so much, you think it may be inferior?

 

 

I know it seems like some can just order away when the time comes, but some of us have to wait till the cash comes in.

There should be a section called "Worth the money" for those of us without unlimited resources who don't want an inferior craft.

 

So how about it? "Cozy on a shoestring"??

 

Man holding sign at exit ramp " Will work for Cozy avionics" :D


Back to building... #618 Cozy MK IV

 

My Cozy web pages, courtesy: Rick Maddy... :cool: WN9G :rolleyes:

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This is an excellent idea... any problem if I name the section Cozy on a Shoestring ?

 

I tell my friends, "I can't afford an airplane new or used, but I can afford materials for chapters 4 through 7."

 

I'll put this under the Building section, but relating to this thread, I am trying to come up with ideas how to better organize the topics of discussion. The feedback I have received is mainly "there's nothing wrong with the setup", but it feels somewhat long in the tooth to me.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder/Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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Rick Maddy indicated that he built the fuselage, then went for the wings.

 

I wondered why, but it makes sense. If you build the strakes, you may not have room to build the wings!

 

Never thought about that.

 

Stand by for some really good tips!


Back to building... #618 Cozy MK IV

 

My Cozy web pages, courtesy: Rick Maddy... :cool: WN9G :rolleyes:

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If you build the strakes, you may not have room to build the wings!

I've seen a number of builders do exactly this, and definitely something that I'm planning to do as well. At most, I would build whatever parts I can, but not assemble if I don't have a storage space. I might keep away from the wings as long as possible though, as I the per-plans sequence is structured to get you into the wings after you've mixed your fair share of epoxy.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder/Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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Shoestring building is exactly my situation. I've had the plans for awhile, but no place to build it except in my apartment. So, basically I'm stuck on building it piecemeal cuz that's the only option. I've read that others have done this so we're not alone. I also don't have a bunch a money to build several chapters at one time. More like one chapter at a time. I do have the advantage of no immediate family to share the time or money, but I don't have the house or garage to build in either. I'm hoping that as time goes by I'll have a number pieces (that can go out the door) that I can take to the hangar for which I'm on a 4 year waiting list. When I get a hangar, I'll be retired or near retirement and can put it together to resemble a Cozy. I'll then spend all my time completing the job. I'll also probably be in mobile home (cheapest way to own a home). So unless I win the lottery or other, shoestring is my only way to go for me. So will any improvements from the basic VFR instrumentation and a new engine. Just so long as it isn't 10 years. Right now I'm just trying to get my pilot's license and hoping the residences near my airport don't successfully close it because of noise. Why did they build or buy a house next to an airport?


GregL

Cozy IV Plans #1161

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Greg, welcome to the Shoestringers Club (maybe we need a more impressive name). Economical building just about drives you to build a Cozy (any type), or a Long-EZ entirely from plans. Another thing to keep on the lookout for is a project that has been started by someone else and put up for sale. They pop up all the time, and might be worth the couple thousand bucks they usually ask for.

 

One thing I've been told by many is to avoid moving to the hangar as long as possible (assuming you need to stay at home for family committments). You might want to compare monthly hangar costs for a year against what it would take to setup a temporary shop. I visited Jerry Schneider's shop/project a while back and have to say that the setup is presently much better than what I have going on in my 2-car garage: http://home.earthlink.net/~jerskip/FIRST/Workshop.html


Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder/Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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:P:P:P First, I gottta say this. YES, I remember the Mallard. And turbines, owner/drivers... The Brickyard. Oh yeah, the sweet, sweet smell of high octane. Nothin' like it. (no comment on the forty thing) Shoestring budgets. Ugh. Yeah that's me all right. One car garage; root cellar and lots of ambition. Lets' see, build the fuselage in the garage, wings in the root cellar... ummm, pray about the rest. Then, pray more. Great idea about a shoestringers club. Might get a lot more people in the air. Hopefully me first :D

 

geez I wish this had a spell check

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My budget for the next few years allows me to build the airframe, but after that I need to do some planning. For now, here's my strategy:

  • Keep focused on my career (need money)
  • No new house upgrades (like I have a choice)
  • No fancy/excessive cars
  • No new hobbies (skiing & golf are expensive)
  • Save, don't spend
When you get down to it, I really don't think there are too many options to save $ with building. The best advice seems to be to "keep to plans", otherwise every modification begs for more time and money.

 

Every time I have a few spare $, from a gift or whatnot, I look through the Aircraft Spruce catalog and buy a few things. I just got the canard installation and elevator "kits" for $42.00.


Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder/Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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I built my long on a string and it worked great. The cozy is getting paid for with over time which means less building time but I gotta pay for it somehow. Having my own machine shop helps. The problem is when I built the long I lived in S.Ca. and aircraft spruce was kind of on the way home. So I would go there after work on Fridays never had to pay shipping. I lived close to Chino airport so there were lots of planes to go look at. Now that I live in Idaho No planes what so ever till you get down by Salt Lake and I have to pay for shipping for everything. I have family in S. Calif I have been thinking it might be cheaper to get a huge order going and drive down and get it. But with diesel running $3.50 a gallon I dont know if I would save any money doing that. STeve:D


Steve Harmon

Lovin Life in Idaho

Cozy IV Plans #1466 N232CZ

http://websites.expercraft.com/bigsteve/

Working on Chapter 19,21

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With all the talk about fuel prices, engine costs, and now even material costs, what weight would you give to someone considering building a Long-EZ vs. a Cozy to save on both building cost and cost of ownership? You obviously have built a Long-EZ and are now building a Cozy (and are sharing in this 'shoestring' topic); any concern over how much a Cozy will cost to own and operate?


Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder/Administrator
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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I have family in S. Calif I have been thinking it might be cheaper to get a huge order going and drive down and get it. But with diesel running $3.50 a gallon I dont know if I would save any money doing that. STeve:D

Those of us in the Memphis area are getting ready to do just this thing. Wicks is having a big sale in November. A lot of their stuff will be 30 to 50% off and anything ordered ahead of time and picked up at their place will be discounted 10%. If you combine the 10% discount on epoxy with not having to pay the hazardous shipping charges, this is the cheapest that you will ever be able to buy it. We are combining our orders, making a master list, placing the orders and taking two trucks with trailers up there to pick the stuff up.


Rick Pellicciotti

Belle Aire Aviation, Inc.

http://www.belleaireaviation.com

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John wrote:

With all the talk about fuel prices, engine costs, and now even material costs, what weight would you give to someone considering building a Long-EZ vs. a Cozy to save on both building cost and cost of ownership? You obviously have built a Long-EZ and are now building a Cozy (and are sharing in this 'shoestring' topic); any concern over how much a Cozy will cost to own and operate?

 

Since I moved to Idaho I make a lot less money than I did in Ca. I still dont regret the move It was really good for my teenage sons. I probably would have built another longeze but the plans were no longer available and my origanals went with the plane when I sold it. Then I thought the cozy would be perfect to teach my boys to fly in. Plus my wife did not like the tandem seating. I flew most of the time by myself or with some friend from work. I built the Longeze for about $20,000 dollars I scrounged everything. I did buy the typical stuff you could not make. At the time I did not have a machine shop so I bought all the Brock stuff. I bought used stuff from other builders My motor was an 0-235 c1c out of a Grumman Yankee. I found it in an FBO in corona sitting on a tire. payed $2,500 for it. It had 1950 hours on it. I redid the cylinders for about 1,000 so I have that in the motor. My radio I bought from Mike Mellville when He upgraded his Longeze. I bought a used prop from a guy in Santa Monica who was upgrading to an 0320 It was a little to much prop so I cut the tips off and it worked good for all the time I flew the plane. I hand propped it to save weight and money. My panel was the basic vfr but boy did it fly sweet. I scared myself several times trying to teach myself airobatics. I bought the brakes from a wrecking yard by the La airport. Now that there is the internet I will buy a lot of stuff for my cozy on line. I figure that it will cost me about $40,000 to build this plane unless I can come up with a sweet deal on a 0360. I tried to upload a pic. of my old plane but I am not doing to well. http://www.canardzone.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=492&stc=1&d=1159847516 Hopefully this will work. STeve

post-1584-141090154414_thumb.jpg


Steve Harmon

Lovin Life in Idaho

Cozy IV Plans #1466 N232CZ

http://websites.expercraft.com/bigsteve/

Working on Chapter 19,21

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