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CutieDarkFae

A Dark Fae's questions thread

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That's what I thought. Good idea, but it's more accurate to have the drawings scanned.

However, for sheets that size, scanning is probably cost prohibitive, but PDF would be great for quick referencing on the monitor.

 

Photos can work, but be super cautious about parallax and scaling directly from the pix.One of the problems with the drawings is that although

there are lots of good dimensions, there is often a lack of reference to stations, water lines, and butt lines ... "some research required."   :cool1:

 

If you use the actual sheet drawings for dimensions into CAD,  you might find that you'll acquire a working knowledge of the aircraft faster

and also become familiar with the inconsistencies and minor errors found in the plans.

You may even discover that "counting all those tiny little boxes" ain't all that bad.

 

Let me know when you get around to lofting the fuselage ....

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CutieDarkFae,

 

Have you reviewed JG drawings? Do you think you can make the plane from those drawings especially the fuselage (of course after research)?

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CutieDarkFae,

 

Have you reviewed JG drawings? Do you think you can make the plane from those drawings especially the fuselage (of course after research)?

 

Stepping in here for CutieDarkFae. Hope you don't mind.

 

If you're asking whether the JG drawings are complete and detailed enough for you to build a Berkut clone from,  the answer would be, "of course after research."

 

Now, having said this, let me further state that the aircraft would not be a "Berkut" because the Berkut kit consisted of numerous molded parts, the fuselage being the largest, and there are no instructions or drawings included in the series for the construction of the respective plugs and molds.  The molded longerons are a good example. You're going to have to roll your own.

 

You specifically mentioned the fuselage ... the plans do show the basic fuselage outline, ( 1:10 three-view drawing ) but none of the lofting, and absolutely no details regarding the plug and mold from which the kit fuselages were pulled, so you're not only going to have to design and loft your own fuselage, you're going to have to figure out how to build it.  (By then, as they say, you could be well on your way in the construction of a "per plans" LongEZ.)

 

Building a fuselage means either funding the design and construction of a plug and molds, or  creating and adapting an alternate one-off method of construction.  So, yes, it's possible, "of course after research."  :)

 

If you're asking whether the The John Griffiths drawings are worth the money, they definitely are.  If you have more than a casual interest in the Berkut and/or you'd like to build a Berkut, the drawings are the entry fee.  In the total cost of building a Berkut, it's a small amount, so for what it's worth, I'd recommend ordering a set. The drawings contain a wealth of information not found anywhere else, and of course, are very well drawn. 

 

Disclaimer:  I'm not involved in the printing/sales of the drawings in any way, shape of form.  I simply bought a set from John Griffiths.

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Well, I built a mockup fuselage today, based off John's 3" width stretch CAD files from ez.org, and I can't say I'm a fan of getting in and out :(  I may be able to get used to it, but it is making me think of Plan B.

 

The fuselage is plenty wide though, and it's comfy when I get in, but reclining at 45 degrees isn't, and would put a lot of stress on my neck :(  I'm also not a fan of headrests, they never feel right.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/22013977@N06/albums/72157675277656811

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Well, I built a mockup fuselage today, based off John's 3" width stretch CAD files from ez.org, and I can't say I'm a fan of getting in and out :(  I may be able to get used to it, but it is making me think of Plan B.

 

The fuselage is plenty wide though, and it's comfy when I get in, but reclining at 45 degrees isn't, and would put a lot of stress on my neck :(  I'm also not a fan of headrests, they never feel right.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/22013977@N06/albums/72157675277656811

Well, I have two comments on your experience so far... 

1.)  Its much better to realize at this point in the build that you don't like the ergonomics of the Long-EZ.  It would be awful to build one of these to completion, to only then realize that its uncomfortable for you.

 

2.)  Try no be discouraged with your mockup comfort.  Ain't nothing like the real thing....

         a.)  Your fuselage sides are not rigid like a real fuselage, and you can't support yourself while your wriggle in to seating position.  With your fuselage sides, which are only 1/8" thick... its nearly impossible to get in to the                 fuselage.  It is much, much, much easier when you have longerons that are smooth, strong, flat, and wide enough to grip with your hands.  People in their 80's can get into their EZ's and do so every sunny weekend.

         b.)  I remember sitting in my Cozy before I put cushions and a head rest in thinking "Ah, I don't know... this ins't comfortable at all!!"  Once I sat in a completed Cozy... I was very surprised at the difference.  Its very comfortable... and             so is the EZ.  

 

As far as headrest... well I don't use my headrest in a car, because I need to lean my head way back to reach it.  In an EZ.... the headrest is more part of the seat, and it supports your head, relieving the neck stress you posted about.  

 

If you think you may still want to build an EZ, you really can't tell anything about the comfort or boarding /  unboarding with a mockup.  Are there any EZ's in your part of the world?  If so... you need to sit in a completed bird.  Right now, what you have is similar to putting a wooden crate in to a car and saying that its not comfortable.  

 

EZ's are like laying back in a dentist chair or a recliner.  Excellent body support from top to bottom, and the reclining position gives the aircraft its low drag profile.  

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Well, I built a mockup fuselage today, based off John's 3" width stretch CAD files from ez.org, and I can't say I'm a fan of getting in and out :(  I may be able to get used to it, but it is making me think of Plan B.

 

The fuselage is plenty wide though, and it's comfy when I get in, but reclining at 45 degrees isn't, and would put a lot of stress on my neck :(  I'm also not a fan of headrests, they never feel right.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/22013977@N06/albums/72157675277656811

Why not reduce the seatback rake angle to one that's more comfortable for you?

Unless you're extremely tall, there shouldn't be interference with head/canopy clearance,

and even if there is, a taller canopy isn't completely out of the question.

 

Andrew is correct in that you really should go climb into a built Long as the experience has got to

be substantially different from climbing into your floor-bound, wood crate mock-up.

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I would not change anything when it comes to the seat angle in the Long-EZ.

The Long-EZ is a long range aircraft and the seating is designed that way. I've ridden in other aircraft where the angle is more upright and it was all good ......... for the first hour.

 

.... but perhaps a Long-EZ is not for you?

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Thanks everybody :)

 

I'm not going to let this discourage me, the mockup is still sitting out on the balcony, awaiting a 2nd go, and Andrew's comments about how I could use the longerons on a real Long-EZ are helping :)

 

There was a Long-EZ parked on the grass at Moruya airport when I went for my TIF, next time I'm down there I'll see if I can find out who owns it and try it out.

 

The teen goes to the dentist in a couple of weeks, maybe I should try the chair out just to see :)

 

I agree that proper upholstery, not just a small cushion and plywood would help a LOT with me be comfortable relaxing in the chair.

 

I'm definitely glad I built the mock-up, I get to find all this stuff out now :)

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There was a Long-EZ parked on the grass at Moruya airport when I went for my TIF, next time I'm down there I'll see if I can find out who owns it and try it out.

 

The teen goes to the dentist in a couple of weeks, maybe I should try the chair out just to see :)

 

I agree that proper upholstery, not just a small cushion and plywood would help a LOT with me be comfortable relaxing in the chair.

 

I'm definitely glad I built the mock-up, I get to find all this stuff out now :)

That is how I got my first ride in a Cozy.... I just looked up the owner and sent him an email asking if I could sit in it some day.

So, measure the plans seatback angle of your EZ, then see if the dentist will set up his chair for you at that same angle.  Dentist chairs usually have adjustable headrests, or bring a rolled up sweater with you for a headrest.  

 

EZ's have a reputation for being one of the most comfortable aircraft... good for hours of comfort.  Nothing wrond with building your mock-up.  Its gives you a trial run of the plans without spending any big money on fiberglass foam and epoxy.

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How much baggage capacity does the Long-EZ have?  I've seen baggage pods, but with 2 people, a tent, other camping gear, food/water for 7 days, an ELT (the food/water is because most of Australia is inhospitable desert and if you crash you'll need it) I figure it won't be enough.

 

Am I being unrealistic with 7 days of water, especially with modern rescue services?  Possibly.  Do I want to be stuck out in the middle of nowhere without it?  Never!

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hmmmmm ....... 7 days of water x 2 people equates to 37.33 gallons of fuel.

SPOT personal locator = a few ounces.

 

That's a pretty easy choice. I vote for the PLB & Fuel.

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How much baggage capacity does the Long-EZ have?  I've seen baggage pods, but with 2 people, a tent, other camping gear, food/water for 7 days, an ELT (the food/water is because most of Australia is inhospitable desert and if you crash you'll need it) I figure it won't be enough.

 

Am I being unrealistic with 7 days of water, especially with modern rescue services?  Possibly.  Do I want to be stuck out in the middle of nowhere without it?  Never!

You should review the LE POH with respect to MGW and start adding up the weight of all the things you think you want to carry, then think about where you'd put them, even WITH pods. If you really want to carry all of that stuff, you're going to need at least a COZY III, if not a MKIV, at which point it becomes easy.

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Just to add .......

There's two types of camping:

The kind you do on a motorcycle vs. the kind you do with a motor-home.

 

You just need to decide which one you want to own and which one you want to rent.

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TMann, motorcycle camping definitely, I don't get why people need to carry a full kitchen/bed/shower/tv/whatever with them when they're camping.  On a good day I fit everything into or on a backpack :)

 

As to the survival gear: CASA legislates that I need to carry survival gear if I go into certain areas, which cover about 2/3 of Australia, and include a lot of the places I'd like to visit.

 

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2009C00093 Specifically part 7 and Appendix III.  Unfortunately, as far as I can find, they don't legislate what and how much.

 

Marc, I did that and came up with some lovely numbers, if it's just me and full fuel, I should have 131kg spare :)  Wai! (japanese happy sound)

 

Does anybody know what happened to some of the projects which were started round updating the Long-EZ?  I know people were working on updated plans, some guy was building wings, another was building bodies.  Did they get anywhere?

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Unfortunately, as far as I can find, they don't legislate what and how much.

That's because it is written by lawyers to protect the government from extensive search and rescue operations only to recover a corpse that can't pay for the expenses.

When you have a PLB you have met that requirement by broadcasting your exact location and minimize both time and expense. I have the Spot PLB which also includes search and rescue coverage. I'd take that over a jug of water any day.

 

If you are really convinced that you need to carry 14 gallons of water per person then don't forget the firewood.

 

Here in the US, when you file a flight plan and you have some of the covered/approved PLBs, if your progress stalls, they start looking into. Not 30 minutes after you're scheduled to arrive.

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I read some of our search/rescue agency's reports, and they're normally finding people in 1 day, though some idiot didn't have a PLB on him but was in mobile phone coverage (so lucky there) so it only took 2 days.  So at this point, enough supplies for 1 day seem fine, and 2 should be plenty :)

 

I'm not sure when they'll start looking here, but I have a registered PLB and I know they'll start looking about 14 minutes after that goes off.

 

Now to get back to CAD'ing, and get time on a 3D printer :)

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