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Landing with backside prop


jprock

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I am thinking about building a canard aircraft and have a question about landing with the prop back there. Do canard pilots think about the prop being really close to the ground on touch-down? From the pictures of different canards I've seen landing, it seems the prop is only inches off the ground...meaning any slightly nose high approach could be disasterous. Could someone that flies canards a lot speak to that?

 

Jack

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.... Do canard pilots think about the prop being really close to the ground on touch-down?

Would thinking about it change anything?

 

From the pictures of different canards I've seen landing, it seems the prop is only inches off the ground...meaning any slightly nose high approach could be disasterous. Could someone that flies canards a lot speak to that?

The aircraft is designed with a maximum recommended propeller diameter. Assuming that you do not put a propeller larger than that on the aircraft, and that you fly within the recommended CG range, the only way that you could touch the prop tips to the ground during a landing is by performing a hard carrier landing while at a very high AOA.

 

I have only heard of a one COZY MKIV flyer that has ground 1/4" or so off his prop tips in a hard, high AOA landing. I'll leave speculation regarding how he managed to do this to the peanut gallery.

 

So, the answer is, no, we don't think about it, because there's no need to. Unless you screw up pretty badly in multiple dimensions, you won't touch the prop.

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Jack,

 

Landing a canard is a little different than a conventional aircraft. You don't stall it in, with ever increasing back pressure, you fly it to touchdown with very little nose-high attitude. The Velocity POH recommends no higher that 12 degrees, or "canard on horizon".

 

Brett

---

Brett Ferrell

Velocity XL/FG

Cincinnati, OH

http://www.velocityxl.com

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I believe what gets a lot of new Canard Drivers into trouble is the landing technique they were taught, i.e. at or near full stall landings.

 

If this is the technique your used to, then you'll need to be on guard to ensure you don't use this technique in your EZ.

 

I fly my approach at 110, cross the fence between 90 and 100, and touch down between 70 and 80 (kts). I give just a little flare prior to touchdown and NEVER (as pointed out already) allow the canard to get at or above the horizon.

 

Because of the unique stall characteristics of the EZ (canard stalls first) it's very EZ to develop fully controllable high rates of descent at low speeds. In every case, the canard will be at or above the horizon.

 

If you see that the canard is at or above the horizon, this is a good clue that your speed is way to slow, and your day is about to be ruined. I would ease the back pressure on the stick (Get the canard down) and apply power (reduce rate of descent). Pulling back on the stick to reduce your rate of descent is only going to make matters worst.

 

My recommendation would be to fly the faster approach and landings as the normal. Once your comfortable with the plane, practice slow flight, and you'll see just how high the canard will go.

 

Waiter

 

.

F16 performance on a Piper Cub budget

LongEZ, 160hp, MT CS Prop, Downdraft cooling, Full retract

visit: www.iflyez.com

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