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Infinity 1


gupri
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I am very interested in the INFINITY 1, a tandem 2-seater, with a Vne of 400kts. My engine of choice would be the Subaru SVX 3.3 L turbo'd and intercooled of ~350hp. With a kit price of under $ 33,000 and a range of 1600 miles it seems like the ideal (and economical) personal fighter.

 

Has anyone else checked out this aircraft on www.infinityaerospace.com ?

 

gupri

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The Infinity 1 has been announced (several years ago), but has never been seen beyond the pictures on their web site. I have heard no word of either prototype flying, or being presented at an event for static display. Many have suggested that the performance claims will not materialize, if the kit manages to be made available.

 

Many builders use the Infinity stick grips, and their retractable gear system is probably the most popular for those that are modifying their planes to be retractrable.

 

Sorry to disappoint, but I wouldn't hold your breath for a kitplane happening any time soon.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder & Canard Zone Admin
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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Hi Hans,

 

sorry, I could not tell you whether prototype 1 flew or not. All I could find out so far, is that Infinity 1 was designed by an ex Navy Commander. It looks like a modified and strengthened LongEzy to me. It was the performance parameters that got me going. As these are apparently NASA confirmed, they should be right - but as John Matcho says, kits may be a while in coming yet.

Try to contact JD Newman off the official website. I've emailed him a couple of times so far - but no replies as yet.

 

Gunter

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Gunter,

 

It was the performance parameters that got me going. As these are apparently NASA confirmed, they should be right...

"Confirmed" is a fairly big leap from the statement on their Web site: "PERFORMANCE derived from NASA Computer Wind Tunnel Analysis". Who knows what that really means, but without a flying prototype it means little in the real world.

 

John Matcho says, kits may be a while in coming yet.

Jon Matcho (me) will tell you that kits will be a long time coming, and if/when they do show up, I surely wouldn't want one of the first kits out the door.

 

As far as canard kitplanes go, www.aerocad.com and www.velocityaircraft.com are the only games in town right now. It would be great to have more to choose from someday, just not today.

 

Try to contact JD Newman off the official website. I've emailed him a couple of times so far - but no replies as yet.

Please let us know if you find out anything of interest.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder & Canard Zone Admin
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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You knowing the three sayings:

(1) "If it sounds too good to be true....."

(2) "Seeing is believing."

(3) "The proof is in the pudding."

 

Personally I wouldn't for one minute believe the performance claims of a plane that hasn't flown yet. We know what a Berkut does with a 200 HP engine. I can't imagine the IF-1 (intentional dig) doing substantially better than that.

 

As for NASA "confirmation", no way! NASA is not in the business of doing that unless they got paid for doing it. The N.A.C.A. developed the analyses and performance figures for thousands of airfoils. Go pick any N.A.C.A. airfoil developed in the past 50 years and you can likely lay claim to "Performance derived from NASA Computer Wind Tunnel Analysis." I urge you to ask JD what he means by that.

Wayne Hicks

Cozy IV Plans #678

http://www.ez.org/pages/waynehicks

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You knowing the three sayings:

(3) "The proof is in the pudding."......

There is no proof in the pudding. Maybe some raisins, but no proof. The saying is:

 

"The proof of the pudding is in the eating".

 

Where the word "proof" uses the meaning "test" (which IS one of "proof"'s real meanings). The saying actually means that "you test the pudding by eating it".

 

What, when you think of it, would "The proof is in the pudding" mean?

 

Anyway, the "Infinity I" doesn't exist, and neither does the "steerable nosegear". If I were a betting man (which I am), I'd bet $100/yr for the next ten years that it won't exist, either. Infinity has been threatening to develop/fly this plane since at LEAST 1996, and it hasn't moved an inch since then. Nice stickgrips (if way overpriced), but that's about it.

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Welcome to English Lit 101.

 

Where does the phrase "the proof is in the pudding" come from?

 

One source says:

It's a sign of our increasingly fast-paced, short-attention-span society that even our old proverbs are being shortened and clipped down from the original full sayings. Word Detective and other etymology sites pointed out that the phrase originated as "the proof of the pudding is in the eating." It means that the true value or quality of something can only be judged when it's put to use. The meaning is often summed up as "results are what count."

 

According to Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, the phrase dates back to at least 1615 when Miguel de Cervantes published Don Quixote. In this comic novel, the phrase is stated as, "The proof of the pudding is the eating."

 

Word Detective and the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms note that the phrase came into use around 1600. However, a bulletin board quotes The Dictionary of Cliches, which dates the phrase to the 14th century. The board also mentions a 1682 version from Bileau's Le Lutrin, which read, "The proof of th' pudding's seen i' the eating." A page of pudding definitions from the Oxford English Dictionary also cites the author Boileau (Bileau) as the first to use the phrase. So it seems likely that the phrase dates back to the 1600s, though the identity of its author is disputed.

 

These days, some people shorten the phrase to simply "proof of the pudding." Even the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language trims it down. (Hicks: So if it's recognized as a phrase in an offical source dictionary of English language, then it must be legitimate, right???) Occasionally, it is even further abbreviated to "proof in pudding," irritating purists who argue that the shortened versions don't mean anything on their own. Let's just hope it doesn't get further reduced any time soon. "Proofpudding" just doesn't cut it.

 

Another source says:

The principal trouble with the proof is in the pudding is that it makes no sense. What has happened is that writers half-remember the proverb as the proof of the pudding, which is also unintelligible unless you know the full form from which the tag was taken, and have modified it in various ways in unsuccessful attempts to turn it into something sensible.

They wouldn’t make this mistake if they knew two important facts. The full proverb is indeed the proof of the pudding is in the eating and proof has the sense of “test” (as it also has, or used to have, in phrases such as proving-ground and printer’s proof). The proverb literally says that you won’t know whether food has been cooked properly until you try it. Or, putting it figuratively, don’t assume that something is in order or believe what you are told, but judge the matter by testing it; it’s much the same philosophy as in seeing is believing and actions speak louder than words.

The proverb is ancient—it has been traced back to 1300 and was popularised by Cervantes in his Don Quixote of 1605. It’s sad that it has lasted so long, only to be corrupted in modern times.

 

But I'm with you on the IF-1.

Wayne Hicks

Cozy IV Plans #678

http://www.ez.org/pages/waynehicks

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It means that the true value or quality of something can only be judged when it's put to use. The meaning is often summed up as "results are what count."

To threadjack further from the subject at hand, this reminds me of my wife's family motto, which adorns their family crest. I can't remember the exact words in a bastardized latin, but they roughly translate to "you're paid what you're worth." I'm sure this was supposed to be inspiring at some level, but the guy credited with coming up with this motto shoveled the stalls at the local duke's stables.

 

-- Len

-- Len Evansic, Cozy Mk. IV Plans #1283

Do you need a Flightline Chair, or other embroidered aviation accessory?

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