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Looking for instructor


Todd Sanderson
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I am looking for an instructor to give me 5 hours dual instruction in my FFT Gyroflug Speed Canard N925TA (Standard airworthiness certificate/normal category) to satisfy insurance requirements. The insurance company has extended the eligibility to an instructor with Vari-eze or Long-eze experience. I am located in Auburn, IN (NE corner of the state; however, I can travel within reason (300 NM or so) in my Lance to pick a qualified instructor. I have 1800TT - mostly in high performance singles/twins/light turbo props and 200 hours in a Velocity RG. Please let me know if anyone is willing to take on the job. I will pay for the transportation, meals, and instruction fees and will do it all in a day if the instructor is up to it :)

 

Thank You

 

Todd Sanderson

todd@sandersonauto.com

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My same reaction! Choices are either:

  • Play the "game" and get the 5-hour checkout, or
  • Self-insure for 5 hours, or
  • Argue the case that this is unnecessary
I know a Long-EZ and Speed Canard fly differently than a Velocity, but I can't imagine all that much.

 

Then again, if the insurance companies would make you do the same in a comparable scenario with two different spam can manufacturers, then this is just status quo making the 5-hour checkout requirement nothing unusual.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder & Canard Zone Admin
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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Actually, they are probably in line with the requirements, but what bothers me is they seem to not want to go the self-insure route and then cover me after that time. I understand their reluctance to insure it without checkout, but the question has to be raised: Am I really safer with a Long-EZ pilot in the back seat that knows nothing of the Speed Canard systems and operations (even though many items are similar many are VERY different) with the possibility of actually causing an accident if we jockey for control of the aircraft? Or, would the insurance company be better off letting me fly the aircraft (with my 200 hours of Velocity time under my belt) for 5 hours uninsured and then bind coverage on me? The letter seems like the better route to me; however, they are the ones with the risk, so I have to comply if I want coverage.

As for certified aircraft generally speaking if you have experience in a Piper Lance (6-seats, constant speed, retract,etc.) then you are automatically covered in a Cherokee 180 (4-seats, fixed prop, fixed gear) as it is basically the same line of aircraft and less complex. I guess the insurance folks think that this aircraft is different enough to waranty the instruction. More than likely, I will probably have to fly it uncovered for 20 hours or so and then give Falcon or AOPA insurance another call, but I prefer the instruction if possible.

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As for certified aircraft generally speaking if you have experience in a Piper Lance (6-seats, constant speed, retract,etc.) then you are automatically covered in a Cherokee 180 (4-seats, fixed prop, fixed gear) as it is basically the same line of aircraft and less complex.

The key here may be that it's the same manufacturer, whereas there's no FFG/GyroFlug series of planes to draw from. That, and the insurance company has got to be not-so-educated in this regard.

 

I'd suggest calling the EAA, but with the Speed Canard being certified, it's not an experimental issue at all.

 

Am I really safer with a Long-EZ pilot in the back seat that knows nothing of the Speed Canard systems and operations (even though many items are similar many are VERY different)...

I'm curious, what are some of the items that are VERY different?

 

...with the possibility of actually causing an accident if we jockey for control of the aircraft?

That can be worked out beforehand, no? "My plane. Your plane." ???

 

Or, would the insurance company be better off letting me fly the aircraft (with my 200 hours of Velocity time under my belt) for 5 hours uninsured and then bind coverage on me?

If you survive 5-20 hours self-insured, I can't imagine why a company would not provide you with insurance.

 

I'm sure you'll be able to find a Long-EZ to give you your checkout time, although you may need to practice some tenacity.

 

Good luck, and please keep us posted with the outcome.

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder & Canard Zone Admin
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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As far a differences go I can only think of a few right now, but the electric trim system, front landing gear system (has an intermediate position and the two gear selector switches have a master & slave override - also the emergency gear extension is simple but requires good knowledge of how it works,) canopy latch system with emergency release, fuel system selection and cutoff, and other items are different and require some time to get used to. The plane also has a constant speed prop which isn't a problem, but adds to the workload of an instructor that probably does not have a CS in his L-EZ. My point here is that it would be better for one person to be learning to fly the plane instead of 2 people at the same time. I know it should be simple to say "yes, my plane" but I have seen over-confident owners not comply and I have seen under-qualified instructors get over their head also. I was teaching a person how to roll my TS-11 Iskra jet and he would pull back hard on the stick everytime we went inverted causing the beginning of compressor stall. I was nearly unable to counteract his death-grip on the stick from the front seat and it could have ended up bad. The fact that you can't physically knock someone's hand off the controls in a tandem configuration that you know will cause a problem is disturbing. It makes it even worse when neither person is up to speed on the actual aircraft. The more I think about this, the more I lean towards taking the risk of flying it myself.

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Actually, they are probably in line with the requirements, but what bothers me is they seem to not want to go the self-insure route and then cover me after that time. I understand their reluctance to insure it without checkout, but the question has to be raised: Am I really safer with a Long-EZ pilot in the back seat that knows nothing of the Speed Canard systems and operations (even though many items are similar many are VERY different) with the possibility of actually causing an accident if we jockey for control of the aircraft? Or, would the insurance company be better off letting me fly the aircraft (with my 200 hours of Velocity time under my belt) for 5 hours uninsured and then bind coverage on me? The letter seems like the better route to me; however, they are the ones with the risk, so I have to comply if I want coverage.

As for certified aircraft generally speaking if you have experience in a Piper Lance (6-seats, constant speed, retract,etc.) then you are automatically covered in a Cherokee 180 (4-seats, fixed prop, fixed gear) as it is basically the same line of aircraft and less complex. I guess the insurance folks think that this aircraft is different enough to waranty the instruction. More than likely, I will probably have to fly it uncovered for 20 hours or so and then give Falcon or AOPA insurance another call, but I prefer the instruction if possible.

What would happen if you's actually create a faît-accomplis, by flying those 5 hours yourself, and then apply for insurance coverage afterwards?

 

bye

Hans

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I was teaching a person how to roll my TS-11 Iskra jet and he would pull back hard on the stick everytime we went inverted causing the beginning of compressor stall. I was nearly unable to counteract his death-grip on the stick from the front seat and it could have ended up bad. The fact that you can't physically knock someone's hand off the controls in a tandem configuration that you know will cause a problem is disturbing. It makes it even worse when neither person is up to speed on the actual aircraft. The more I think about this, the more I lean towards taking the risk of flying it myself.

Todd,

 

Isn't the TS-11 just a metal Long EZ with the tail on the wrong end, before the propeller is mounted? ;) -- A beautiful plane!! :envy::envy::envy:

I Canardly contain myself!

Rich :D

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