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Canard spotted in a movie


Jon Matcho
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I was watching 'The 6th Day' movie, w/Arnold Shwarzenneger, when I spotted a canard parked in a hangar of some sort.

 

It would have been better if it flew, but the 1 second it was in picture makes this movie a "must see". :)

Jon Matcho :busy:
Builder & Canard Zone Admin
Now:  Rebuilding Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E
Next:  Resume building a Cozy Mark IV

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I haven't seen this movie, but I did see something on the History Channel this weekend that made my jaw drop.

 

Tivo (and similar) users may want to set a timer for the next occurrence of "Last Secrets of the Axis." a WWII documentary that sheds light on the Japanese super weapons that were on the cusp when we dropped the bomb. Actually the show is about geopolitical and cultural tie-ins between Germany and Japan, but mostly about the cool tech that never got deployed.

 

Back on topic, they showcased the Japanese Kyushu J7W1 Shinden fighter which used a revolutionary canard design. The prototypes we found had props, but this bird was designed to be a jet fighter! The historians interviewed all agreed that if Japan was able to get this fighter airborne sooner, the war would have lasted much longer and we would have lost many more bombers than we did.

 

The show had black and white pictures of the Shinden, but also had several animated sequences of both the prop and jet powered Shinden attacking our bombers.

 

Just a side note, the Shinden's main gear operates like the Infinity retracts, while the nose is opposite of the Rutan-derived canards. Also the castors at the bottom of the rudders apparently are there to protect the prop from ground strikes on rotation or landing.

 

The japanese arrived at the canard pusher design as a practical way of making a single-engined jet aircraft. Unable to produce materials that could withstand the exhaust temperatures, the turbine had to be placed at the rear, while contemporary dual jets hung off of the wings so that meltable in the airframe would be behind the jets. Putting this much weight aft, meant that they had to move the flight control surfaces somewhere else, hence the canard design.

 

-- Len

-- Len Evansic, Cozy Mk. IV Plans #1283

Do you need a Flightline Chair, or other embroidered aviation accessory?

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I haven't seen this movie, but I did see something on the History Channel this weekend that made my jaw drop.

 

Tivo (and similar) users may want to set a timer for the next occurrence of "Last Secrets of the Axis." a WWII documentary that sheds light on the Japanese super weapons that were on the cusp when we dropped the bomb. Actually the show is about geopolitical and cultural tie-ins between Germany and Japan, but mostly about the cool tech that never got deployed.

 

Back on topic, they showcased the Japanese Kyushu J7W1 Shinden fighter which used a revolutionary canard design. The prototypes we found had props, but this bird was designed to be a jet fighter! The historians interviewed all agreed that if Japan was able to get this fighter airborne sooner, the war would have lasted much longer and we would have lost many more bombers than we did.

 

The show had black and white pictures of the Shinden, but also had several animated sequences of both the prop and jet powered Shinden attacking our bombers.

 

Just a side note, the Shinden's main gear operates like the Infinity retracts, while the nose is opposite of the Rutan-derived canards. Also the castors at the bottom of the rudders apparently are there to protect the prop from ground strikes on rotation or landing.

 

The japanese arrived at the canard pusher design as a practical way of making a single-engined jet aircraft. Unable to produce materials that could withstand the exhaust temperatures, the turbine had to be placed at the rear, while contemporary dual jets hung off of the wings so that meltable in the airframe would be behind the jets. Putting this much weight aft, meant that they had to move the flight control surfaces somewhere else, hence the canard design.

 

-- Len

It's in the Smithsonian:

http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/aero/aircraft/kyushu_j7w1.htm

By the way that's some prop hanging from the ass of that bird!!!

Kumaros

It's all Greek to me

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