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Tsio-360-a,ab


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ok, I'm trying to figure out this engine, as we all end up doing. I have some good advice and that is to get copies of the engine log book and review them. I talked to the salvage yard and they are gladly faxing me the log on the overhaul and the current info. Now I just have to figure out how to do AD research and figure out if enough parts were replaced to insure that the overhaul was a real one or a bare minimum one. Ain't building fun.

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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  • 2 weeks later...

just an update on the engine, 7500 for engine and all accessories including prop govenor, turbo, fuel injection, starter, alternator and bed mount part of engine mount, exhaust system, etc.

 

2050 hours, 650 smoh.

I will drive to yard in minnesota (just 11 hours) in a few weeks after i recieve a copy of the log books. The yard has offered a borescope for me to use while there and I may even have an x A&P along for the ride.

 

Only problem is they can't find the log books, but they will, or the price goes down down down.

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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  • 1 month later...

well, they finally found the log books and they look pretty good, rebuilt in 89, fatal accident in 97, read about it in faa report and my buddy remembers the accident, he didn't investigate it but one of his investigators did. Pilot and passenger went to 25000 feet, passenger felt bad, closed her eyes, next thing she new she woke up in a tree in the plane, pilot was dead.

 

As it turns out, ox bottle had just been filled, the investigator went to FBO and saw the OX tank and it was compressed AIR, pilot died from hypoxia (per FAA), looks like oximiter is a good idea. FBO had been using compressed air for OX for 5 years, unknowingly.

 

Now onto engine, all new cylenders in 89, chromed, i here that the chrome will looked cracked in a bore scope. Also there is no prop, how big a wrench will i need to turn crank to make sure rings hav'nt rusted in place?

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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Wrench size will depend on how much rust there is. 8-]

 

Might consider taking a torque wrench and seeing how much it takes to turn it over. Some guru will know what the number should be around.

 

You gave them so long to find that log book... Check that the ink is dry on all thoes entry's!!!!

 

If the FBO used compressed air for OX for 5 years without a problem does that mean we have a super cheap OX system for experimentals now???

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Originally posted by LargePrime

If the FBO used compressed air for OX for 5 years without a problem does that mean we have a super cheap OX system for experimentals now???

Make sure you place the emphasis on "experiment" in experimental. :eek:

 

How the heck do you get away with something like that for five years without anyone noticing??

Evan Kisbey

Cozy Mk IV plans # 1114

"There may not be any stupid questions, but I've seen LOTS of curious idiots..."

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  • 2 weeks later...

all about point of view isn't it.

 

If no one noticed then why pay for OX when we can use compressed air?

 

Further if there were no problems for 5 years who's to say the Compressed air/OX issue really caused the accident? The investigator probably stopped looking as soon as he found this, when it is very likely this was not the problem. Cause if this was the problem it would have been noticed a long time ago.

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  • 1 month later...

OK i now own a tsio360a 2000tt 600smoh

 

Good news for my mount, the continental is a "bed" mount, so I should be able to use the franklin mount as a starting point, life is good!

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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Just talked with a guy that has quite a bit of time between, 337, two of my engines and he said engine held about 70% power to 25000. The only problem that high is there is a detonation risk because of the high temp of the compressed air going into the engine, hellooooooo intercooler.

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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just thinkin

 

I'm probably going to scrap the entire exhaust system, turbo and all.

 

Wen i fab the new one is it important to have all legs of the exhaust the same length and similar shape?

 

enjoy the build

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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Runner shape and length can be changed, but use caution when doing so. The runners should be of equal length relative to each other, this helps ensure each cylinder makes equal power. Note there is an optimum runner length that will maximize power depending on the engine RPM, displacement, runner diameter, etc. Also note nothing is absolute, many automotive applications ignore the equal runner concept alltogether.

 

I think Bingleis touches on exhaust design in Firewall Forward. Definitely get some input from someone familiar with turbo continentals, they'll be able to tell you alot more than people here on this forum.

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The reality is, people familiar with these engines are familiar with the certificated installation and just bolt on the appropiate exhaust system for the plane that was certified eons ago.

 

So, the more info i gain, the better it goes and then when i talk to an engineer at continental (probably on the side) he can bring me up to speed quickly.

 

Thanks aaron

maker wood dust and shavings - foam and fiberglass dust and one day a cozy will pop out, enjoying the build

 

i can be reached at

 

http://www.canardcommunity.com/

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In a N.A engine one cylinders exhaust pulse can be used to scavenge the cylinder. The correct length of the pipe can make this effect quite pronounced.

 

In a turbo/super engine the exhaust cannot be “scavenged” by the pulse. Because of this turbo engines generally have a bit more “exhaust gas recycling” built in, as they cant get the cylinder as clean.

 

The pipes therefore are not as important from the point of view of getting the pulse advantage because, as far as I know, the pulse cant be used in a turbo. However there is another important consideration. Heat

 

The Hotter the exhaust that hits the turbine the more energy the turbine will have. So shorter is better. In theory one could build an optimized turbine to take advantage of this heat while restricting the engine exhaust as little as possible. In practice you will buy the off the shelf turbine that is the best match.

 

So in practice it wont matter much.

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