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Kent Ashton

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Kent Ashton last won the day on February 15

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About Kent Ashton

  • Rank
    Member

Personal Information

  • Real Name (Public)
    Kent Ashton
  • Location (Public)
    Concord, NC
  • Occupation
    retired USAF

Flying Information

  • Flying Status
    1000+hrs, Cozy III, IV, Long-ez

Project/Build Information

  • Plane
    Cozy Mark IV
  • Plane (Other/Details)
    Ellison carb, 2 LSE igns
  • Plans Number
    150

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  1. Here's an example of the moisture that comes out of an engine after flying. My oil temp was the Lycoming-recommended 180°F. After having had experience with spalled cams and tappets (i.e. rust), I blow it out with an air-mattress pump after landing unless I plan to fly again soon; not sure how much it helps. I'm sure the moisture, left in the engine, condenses on the parts. Maybe they are protected by the residual oil film, maybe not, but the film slowly drains off. If you are using a dehydrator it will help that too, otherwise the desiccant has to extract the moisture, which is also oily and coats the desiccant. Recently it had been cold here for several days and a warm front blew in. Everything in the hangar was dripping as moisture in the warm air condensed on the chilled airplane. Even the fiberglass was dripping. 😞 IMG_1779.MOV
  2. Ah yes. Did you know Wilgrove is closing? Sold for development. There are a lot of improvements one can make on an EZ but i don’t know of a comprehensive list. I guess an O-320 and a longer nose are the main change. It takes a lot of research to find what has been done before. Check out the projects for sale in my “sales i’ve seen” thread. Some good values there.
  3. This EZ today: decent price considering it has wings, canard, strakes, cowls and 500 hr. engine. Ugly nose but that can be fixed pretty fast. Needs "tip sails" 🙂 LONG EZ WITH O-320 • $15,000 • FOR SALE • 75% complete Fuse is on wheels, canopy is glassed and cut out but not finished on the inside. Wings are 80% complete, need tip sails mounted (supplied) and finished on the inner side next to fuse. All the major parts are built. Rans canard built by Dennis Olman. Lots of parts go with it, electric pitch trim, nose gear actuator and speed brake. Cozy Girls controls, engine mount, nav lights and power supply etc. Pre made strakes with baffles, Carbon cowl, upper and lower from a Berkut. 1 complete original set of plans. $15,000 with a 500 hour 0-320 out of a Cardinal • Contact Alfred Jones, Owner - located Marthasville, MO United States • Telephone: 3144986982 • Posted February 14, 2020
  4. I downloaded the Rev 5 drawings about 6 months ago in PDF format and had them printed on a large-format printer at a FedEx store and they were right on. There was some confusion about the corner marks but it was just a problem with the marks, not the base drawings. I am sure the Rev 5 drawings are right. I believe the build manual is still available on Ari Glantz's website.
  5. I saw this BD-5 on Ebay today which reminded me of a Peanuts cartoon where Snoopy thinks thoughtfully (yes, a dog can think thoughtfully) "Sometimes we do smart things and sometimes we do dumb things. One of the smartest things I every did: I never bought a Nehru jacket". One of the dumbest things I ever did was buy a BD-5 project (twice!). Here's a chap on ebay today who wants to get his hand out of the BD-5 jar but he is asking $18K so I suspect he will will be stuck a bit longer. What interests me is that he wants to sell it with no documents--not even a bill of sale! It has Canadian registry, which could likely be imported but the inspector/DAR will undoubtedly want to examine the chain of title to make sure it was not just hijacked from a Canadian hangar. Anyway, the ad had some good photos of the drive system. Glad mine is gone. If you ever want to buy a BD-5, lie down and take a nap until the urge goes away.
  6. Have two of these. They are "unobtanium" these days. One is 120" + 6" of bare cable, the other is 105" + 4" of bare cable. They might have been installed in a project but never actually used. PM me. I will post a "sold" if they sell. $43 each includes shipping.
  7. I got my oil cooler adjustable blocker installed. Had to cut off some of it off (dashed lines) because it hit the upper cowl and vent lines when fully open. It moves pretty easily from the cockpit. I will take another picture when I clean up the engine.
  8. More on the chap with the cooling problem (above). I see that he has some armpit intakes which appear to be adequate (pic 1). The armpits appear to feed up to the bottom of the cylinders (pic 2). Good so far. However, I wonder if he is losing air pressure through the big open triangle (arrow, pic 3) or letting air out of the fins prematurely which exits through the triangle. Also, the exit air from his oil cooler and the exit air from the right-side cylinders are trying to get through a small cowl exit on the right side depicted above. That can't be good. He has reduced the cowl exit by partially blocking it with the oil cooler exit. We might think that would raise the right-side temperatures but air can cross-flow to the left exit so the difference from side-to-side may not be great, however, the total exit size is smaller than it looks because of the cooler sheet metal. I have laid on my back under the engine and thought about how to make a plenum for updraft armpit cooling such as his. I decided there was too much stuff under the engine--exhausts, for example-- that would have to be sealed or closed-off to make an airtight plenum. I wouldn't be surprised if he has some big leaks in that lower plenum and he is losing lots of air. Maybe he has no seal at all--just air directed to the bottom of the engine. A piccolo tube manometer would tell the tail. Another thing: the oil cooler has a surface area 3-4 times greater than the exit for the oil cooler which is likely restricting the flow through the cooler. None of this may be valid of course, but it's fun to think about. 🙂 BTW, Lycoming cylinders have a restriction on the aft side of the right cylinders (pic 3, dashed line) and the forward side of the left cylinders which ought to be allowed for, otherwise there will be no flow up those sides if the baffles are very tight.
  9. Facebook--a repository of dumb advice: Saw this plaintive on a FB page (pic 1). It is an honest inquiry. I guess I was there once myself but building a BD-5, you learn such things as the minimum bend radius for alloys. I think Nat put these little gremlins in the plans to frustrate builders; the bracket for the fuel control is another one. The radius of the part is drawn impossibly tight and if bent as drawn 2024-T3 will generally crack. The answers here range from "make it out of fiberglass", "use a kitchen door handle", "2024 cannot be formed" (false), "use aluminum from Lowes" (soft 3003 alloy), and "practice on scrap". True, there were some useful answers but out of 17, nobody referred the OP to a document showing the bend radius required for the various alloys or warn the builder that trying to heat 2024 T3 with a torch in order to bend it will ruin the heat-treat of the alloy. https://www.americanmachinetools.com/bend_radius.htm I/8" 2024 T-3 requires a _minimum_ bend radius of about .062, in other words, bend it around a .125" or bigger rod. Having a few of these bending dies around the shop is handy (pic 2). I make them by welding a suitable steel rod to a piece of flat stock and cut to various lengths. Weld a bit at a time and let the welds cool in between or you will be asking your FB buddies "Why is my welding curved." 🙂
  10. The New Hampshare EZ first listed here with pics for $9500, reduced today https://www.canardzone.com/forums/topic/21972-sales-ive-seen/?do=findComment&comment=65528 LONG EZ • $7,850 • PROJECT FOR SALE • 1985 Rutan Long EZ AFTT 398. Lycoming O-235 TT unknown. More info and pics available. • Contact Kevin Provost, Owner - located Keene, NH United States • Telephone: 7602075101 • Posted February 10, 2020 ----------------------- I saw that David Hanson has a Cozy IV gear bow for $600. His phone number is in this thread.
  11. If it was this accident, there is no mention of a lost canopy and it appears the non-instrument rated pilot flew into IMC https://planecrashmap.com/plane/ne/N360KK/
  12. Just thinking about this post I saw on a FB site where the chap has cooling problems. It looks to me like his exit area is inadequate. I do not think there is any great suction created by the prop at the cowl exit. A 2-blade prop spinning at 2700 RPM has a blade passing through the cowl exit flow 90 times per second (45 Revs per second X 2) so my guess is that the spinner and hub are just a big ol' block to exit airflow and in fact might be creating a high(er) pressure area ahead of the hub and spinner. To illustrate this, one time I had a fuel leak from the vent at the top of my fuselage and I found fuel had been blown aft along the top of the cowl, then back under the top cowl and forward 8-10" resulting in fuel stains on the inside of the upper cowl! It blew my mind to find that airflow was being blown into the upper cowl (with standard updraft cooling). I think the air exiting the fins in the upper cowl and exiting the cowl is very turbulent and disorganized and has to be pushed out of the cowl by the pressure of air coming out of the fins. Any restriction of the exit area resists the flow of air out of the cowl, and thus, resists flow through the fins. It is in our interest, I think, to make that exit resistance as low as possible. When I look at this fellow's exit (pic 1), I would guess he is trying to push the exit air through fairly small openings at the sides of the cowl exit. In my downdraft EZ project (pic 2), I had terrible cooling until I installed exits just below the fins and set forward from the prop. I surmise that with my new exits, there was very little resistance to the exiting air. The best way to troubleshoot cooling problems is with piccolo tubes installed above and below the cylinders. A Lycoming takes about 5.5" of pressure differential to cool adequately and with the piccolo tubes and a manometer, you can quickly see if your changes are improving the differential.
  13. New lisiting, I think. Looks OK but could use a good spiffing-up on the inside RUTAN VARIEZE • $17,500 • AVAILABLE FOR SALE OR TRADE • Rutan Varieze...ready to fly away...your very own mini Thunderbird. Current condition inspection done by The Jet Guys in Covington TN. 707 hours on the airframe, Continental O-200 engine, TSMOH 405.5, VFR, Bendix King KY 97A, No ADS-B, Has the upgraded front wheel fork from Nate Mullins 3:23 business. Would trade for a Flying Zenith 701 or 750 • Contact Jonathan Lundberg, Friend of Owner - located Eagleville, TN United States • Telephone: 5027449537 • Posted February 8, 2020
  14. This on the Cozylist today. Yeah I can well-believe he has $18K in it. Heck of a deal: Cozy Mark IV Project for Sale $5,500 - - - engine mount, canopy and windows, cowling, electric retract, almost all needed airframe parts; $18,000 invested Nelson Amen 210-834-1991 nelson.p.amen@gmail.com Located in San Antonio, Texas
  15. Correction: I previously posted this was in Colorado. It's Ohio. Likely N47VE. The owner owns several canard airplanes. A 1600 hour engine is basically a run-out but if it has good compression and is not making metal, it could be nursed a while longer. Don't know much about Continentals. VARIEZE • FOR SALE AS IS • Currently stored TT258 engine 0200 T T1600 Too many projects. 15000. Obo. Raymond Parker513-884-9637 • Contact Raymond Parker, Owner - located Loveland, OH United States • Telephone: 513 884 9637 • 513 583 9637 • Posted January 12, 2020 https://registry.faa.gov/AircraftInquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=47VE See it flying here: https://youtu.be/njAg0o8FAx0

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