Jump to content
N722SE

Starting to Build MK-IV In Need Of Advice.

Recommended Posts

Hello, All, my name is Trystyn Clark I am 15 years old and based out of Livermore, CA. I have over 200 hours of flight time and a lot of Canard time. I own a 1946 C140, and I am EAA 663's newsletter editor and board member. I have been looking at building a Vans RV-10 but I just can't stand the way Aluminum looks... I think composite is very simple and looks really good once finished. I am looking at starting a Mk-IV build in early April. I know this is no little project, and it takes time. I would like to get some advice on starting like tools that are must have's, and what I should plan for during the build. I am looking at engines already. What would you recommend on epoxy? Things like that. Thank you!

 

Trystyn Clark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, All, my name is Trystyn Clark I am 15 years old

 

 

Ha!  We don't see much Liberation Serif 'round these parts, pardner.  Me an' the boys mostly stick to Helvetica Neue--maybe a Bodoni if we're feeling frisky.  :-)

 

The nice thing about canards is that they don't take many tools to build.  A bandsaw is handy, a die grinder, lots of folks swear by the reciprocating tools (Fein).  Most of the rest are just simple hand tools.  Nice flat 12' x 4' work table.  I would say the average Mark IV project is going to take $35,000-50,000 to complete.  When I was 15, I built a Boy Scout Canoeyak which seemed expensive to me at the time.  You seem a little more prosperous but it's still a large financial undertaking.

 

Wyncha trade your C140 for a Varieze or cheap Long-ez and fly that for a while?  As you know, you can work on it and modify it as you please which is rather fun.  They all need upgrading and new tech.  It will teach you a lot about canards/composites.  

 

Oh and I forgot: a digital scale.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck yeah like Kent mentioned... if you like flying, you can buy a flying Varieze for less than $20k.  Just make sure you get a PPI.

 

To get started, a few things are good to have....

1.)  You need the support of your family.  This is a bigger project than building your own house.

2.)  you need somewhere to work on the project.  Do you have a workshop that you can use for the next 5 to 10 years?  It needs power outlets, heat, and the table Kent mentioned.

3.)  The decimal tape measure.

4.)  Epoxy hot box (I used a free small fridge with a lightbulb and thermostat inside). 

5.)  Great pair of scissors (or EC cutter electric scissors) for cutting fiberglass.

6.)  Sandpaper variety pack

7.)  Jigsaw

8.)  Cordless drill and a set of numbered bits

9.)  Oscillating tool and HSS blade

 

This will be plenty to get started.  You end up getting what you need as you make progress.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What would you recommend on epoxy?

 

I have used MGS 335 (except for the fuel tanks) and have no regrets.  Its been a great choice of epoxy for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am looking at engines already. 

Yeah... looking at engines is FUN!  Try your best to focus on airplane engines... specifically the Lycoming 360 that the plans specify.  You can go new, clone, rebuilt, mid-time, tons of options.... 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been looking at building a Vans RV-10 but I just can't stand the way Aluminum looks... I think composite is very simple and looks really good once finished. 

The RV kits are easier to build.... you assemble them like Lego's.  It is a huge accomplishment when anyone finishes any homebuilt... but the RV kits give you the highest likelihood of completion.

 

A fiberglass plans built airplane is crafted... every little curve you see on an EZ was created with a piece of sandpaper and lots of work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like MGS 285 but have been considering moving to ProSet (not sure which system off-hand).  The cost of these systems is more, but relative to the other expenses is a relatively small enhancement.

 

Building one of these is an education in project management (and life management).  It will take you what-seems-like-forever just to get the airframe together.  You have plenty of time to look at engines and avionics, but any decisions there are likely premature.  Keep an eye open for all that, but don't feel any pressure to decide until you have something that looks like an airplane.

 

Welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Trystyn! I'm a 22 year old guy in Union City, not too far from you. Just starting my Cozy Mk IV this weekend too. Keep in touch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×