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Jon Matcho

My Quickie Q2 Project

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The Quickie Q2 is a side-by-side canard-type aircraft.  Major differences from the other Rutan EZs are:

  • Tractor (vs. pusher) propeller
  • The Quickie canard provides the majority of the lift
  • The nose gear does not retract in the tri-gear configuration
  • A tail-dragger configuration is also an option
  • VariEze-like performance

 

I came upon an opportunity to acquire an unstarted Q2 kit that I could not resist.

 

I will explain my plans for all of this (my Cozy, the Tri-Q, and this Q2 kit) in the near future as I'm still working through some of it.  Until then, here's a picture of me "flying" the Q2.

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Why cool Jon,

 

I can't wait to see your build progress and when you get to your first actual in the pattern flight :-)

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Why cool Jon,

 

I assume you meant "way", but at first I saw that as "Why Jon, why?"   :)  

 

Thanks, I aim to have my other plane flying next year.  More to come...

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What? Test flight with no parachute?

 

 

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Yep..typo...should have been way cool

Looks like it was a factory new package,..what a find

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Yes, it does look like a factory crate, but credit goes to the seller on this deal.  He and I were able to come to an arrangement that he would bead-blast all the metal parts, make a crate, and drop off at a freight company for delivery.  After weeks of back and forth with emails and pictures, I have a like-new kit (in New Jersey) without ever having gone to where it was (Texas).

 

Attached is a pic showing how you can turn rather old metal into beautiful like-new metal parts.

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Major difference between the old hardware look and the cleaned up hardware...did he paint it with something after bead blasting

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He just coated it with an oil for the short term.  My first order of business with the aluminum is to clean and prep for a chromate conversion coating that a friend is helping me with.

 

Not sure what I'm going to do with the steel yet though.

 

I'm sensing a recommendation... please  :)

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Those must be two different parts.  The hole is bigger on the shiny scratched one.  

 

I have heard good and bad things about shot peening (bead blasting).  It creates a surface layer than has compressive stresses and resists crack propagation (good), but I seem to recall that bead blasting can also hide cracks in aluminum because it can "smoosh" the crack closed (bad). 

 

Some more info in http://www.metalimprovement.com//premium/PDF/greenbook_v9/english/MIC%20Green%20Book%20-%209th%20edition%20-%20Complete%20Book.pdf

 

-Emron

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There is a difference between shot peening and bead blasting. BB is more of a cleaning process. SP changes the surface of the alloy.

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Not sure what I'm going to do with the steel yet though. )

An epoxy primer and catalyzed topcoat of your choice will hold up well. With an epoxy primer, even a rattle-can topcoat will do well. Powder-coat if you want a more chip-resistant finish.

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Emron!  :)  

 

I thought the same things regarding surface destruction, cracking, etc., but after more research I came to the conclusion that glass bead blasting was non-destructive, especially when done so the beads do not disintegrate.  Attached is a picture of the 'before' piece (the 2nd piece was only shown for contrast, and was done later).  

 

Even with those other arguments until the bead blasting was offered I was close to moving forward with a mild abrasive blasting.  I suspect this is one of those areas we builders talk and worry about that really isn't a concern -- especially when doing a top coat of some sort on the parts.  I could be wrong.

 

Kent, would you still recommend an epoxy paint over a chromate conversion coating assuming no difference in price (I have a good deal lined up)?  

 

I also thought the welds on all the pieces were very good FWIW.  Thanks for the feedback, appreciated!

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How did you finish the nice-looking ones?

 

I have only used chromate conversion (Alodine) on aluminum pieces.  Hang them in a jar of Alodine for a few minutes.

 

For steel, I see that a chromate conversion can be used over zinc plating   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromate_conversion_coating  but I don't think it does very much on bare steel.  Your pieces, being a little chipped up, I would scotchbrite, sand, or wirewheel them to remove rust, epoxy-prime, and paint.  That's about the easiest thing to do.

Edited by kent ashton

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There's no finish on the nice-looking parts yet. They're just coated with an oil for now, which I'll wash off before treating. All of the parts are now nice-looking (bead blasted).

 

Thanks for the tips! I don't want to go crazy, just prevent oxidation...

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