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Kent's Long-EZ project


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--more:  I saw this homemade compressor for a Continental made from 1" channel and washers.  Builder says he can hold it compressed with a bolt in the perimeter of the head.  (pic)  It was appealing but I had already broken down and ordered a Valve Wizard tool, much praised by the RV crowd.  At $160 it is expensive but an adjustable tool from Aircraft Tool Supply is about $60 and a little fiddly, they say.  https://valvewizard.com/index.html

    Trouble is, there are different wizard models for the parallel-valve and angle-valve Lycomings.  (pic 2, angle-valve model)

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I am seeing some really nice work here and there, nicer than my early effort.  I will post a few ideas.  First, nice seat bulkheads by Joe Polenek.  His jig is a work of art (pic).  It appears he added lower back support in the final version.  I don't urge anyone to copy the effort because (1) Cozy seats are very comfortable as is, and (2) it just turns a 4-year project into a 6-year project.  Still, it could probably be done without the jig.

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Next, Alex Leidl's heated pitot install.  Good but maybe it tempts you (get it?) to fly in ice, freezing rain, and T-storms.  IMO a Cozy is not the airplane for that.  Alex has printed various parts, a heater cuff (pic 4) and nose door hinges.  I have 8 camlocs on the door which weigh about as much as his metal latch.  All nice features, certainly well-done,  but increase the build time.

I like how he aligned his strakes (pic 3).  Very precise if you can borrow the laser level

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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A simple aircraft flipper.  Easier than the bigger one I made.  I have also flipped the airplane by bolting a long 2 X 6 to one end of the centerspar and rolling it over with the nose on a pad.  Sorry didn't note the credit for the flipper

And an idea for making rudder springs.  To me, these sorts of things are the real joy in building your own airplane.

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Just reading a plaintive post by an RV owner who had an engine fire, no insurance,  and doesn't know how to fix his airplane.   https://vansairforce.net/community/showthread.php?t=209597

I guess he has two choices:  (1) start learning about engines and how his airplane is constructed or (2) hand it off to a shop and pay the bill.  RVs have the advantage of being fairly ordinary metal airplanes so an ordinary aircraft repair shop could probably work on it.  I think it would be harder for composite owners to find a shop, still, there are folks like Mr. Z or the Jet Guys in Covington, TN  who do repair them.  My overseas buddy who had no knowledge of composite building rebuilt the nose of his Cozy ripped off in a taxi accident and did almost all of the work himself.  I think I would rather repair a composite airplane than a riveted airplane.

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I am removing a couple cylinders to re-ring them.  The biggest hassle is just getting the baffles off.  Baffling is fiddly in a pusher with updraft cooling.  Here is the hardest baffle to remove and install: the forward side of #4.  I trimmed off a piece that interfered with removal and added some nutplates; formerly used screws and lock nuts but nutplates are easier.  Now I think I will be able to unbolt the cylinder leaving the baffle in place.  We'll see. 

RIP Queen Elizabeth.  What a lady.  I have a Silver Jubilee (25 years) mug from my tour in England. 

Edit:  I realized today that the nutplate on the left side of the first picture, is installed on the wrong side

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Edited by Kent Ashton
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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Engine work:  My engine was a 0-time rebuild by Aerosport Power--a reputable rebuilder but the oil consumption was never good.  Has 770 hours now.  Some years ago I removed, honed and re-ringed #1 and #3 which seemed to work well.   https://www.canardzone.com/forums/topic/18661-kents-long-ez-project/?do=findComment&comment=78383    Now the engine is using a quart in two hours which is the Lycoming limit.  #1 and #3 exhausts have a nice tan color but #2 and #4 exhausts are very sooty and I can see oil puddling in the bottom of #4 after shutdown.  I removed #2 and #4.  The hone pattern is still visible but the cylinder looks pretty slick inside.  (pic 3) There are dark rings corresponding to ring position where light rust apparently formed during one of my heart attacks and the airplane was not flying much.   (pic 3)  😞   Similar to pics in the earlier thread. 

The small square carbide tool (pic 1) below worked pretty well for removing carbon at the top of the barrel.   The rig I made to hold the cylinder for honing is shown in the link above.  This time I cut some cardboard so the hone doesn't sling hone-oil all over me (not shown).     I cut off a bit of the hone-end this time to let it go deeper into the cylinder (pic2).  The metal plate is to protect the valves.

I honed the cylinders using the specified 120 grit Flex ball hone chucked in my 18V Dewalt drill.  I inserted the ball hone in the cylinder and liberally doused it with hone-oil.  First attempt, the drill was running too fast and the pattern was too flat--about 30 deg (pic 4)  Run the drill on low speed and keep the hone moving up and down.  You are looking for 45 deg cross-hatch.  It only took 6-8 strokes to reestablish the hone cross-hatch. (pics 4.5).  .  I measured the cylinder before honing and will report how much metal was removed.  Not much, I think.

After honing, the cross hatched surface is much rougher than before.  Maybe this engine did not get the proper hone from the reman and that is why it has always used more oil than I would expect.  After wiping out the cylinder, I used a rough Scotch-brite pad and a stream of mineral spirits to clean the bore.  The S.B. pad is needed to remove shards of metal left from the honing.  I will wash them in hot soapy water to get all the grit out and coat the inside with break-in oil.  Tip:  use no assembly lube on cylinders, it over-lubricates.   More later.

 

 

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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12 hours ago, jridge said:

Got any better photos of your exhaust valve in that cylinder?

I have cleaned the exhaust valve so a pic wouldn't mean much.  I saw no signs of a discolored crescent that indicates a loose valve guide and poor heat transfer to the valve seat but the valve does seem a little loose in the guide.  I'm gonna check that further per SB388C (valve wobble check).  I read that Lycoming began to use harder valve guides in about 1999 but that is about when my engine was built-up.  Not much I can do about a loose guide except borescope the valve head periodically.

My pistons were pretty carboned-up.  Should have taken a picture.

I was told by a good A&I shop-owner that his shop does work on cylinders and most engine rebuilders do not try to recondition them anymore--cheaper just to buy new cylinders.  We got 8 cylinders out of the rebuilder's dumpster.  A couple of them looked good enough to recondition but I did not mic them.

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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My understanding of a "new" engine never getting good (low) oil consumption is poor ring seating during break in.  There is a guy named Mike Bush that talks of this in great lengths here: 

 

I think these are the slides that go with it: https://resources.savvyaviation.com/wp-content/uploads/slides_airventure2021/2021-07-28 0830 F7 Cylinder Break-In Do it Right.pdf

 

I have noticed several new engine owners try and break in an engine on the ground (or at least do test runs) - which is what Mike says is what can cause the rings never to seat.   Use of proper break in oil (I use mineral - but he mentions other kinds that work (as they do not have the special lube that prevents proper ring wear break in).).

 

Might be old news for many (most?) - but I find some people do not know this - so I share....

 

M.

 

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Getting my cylinders reinstalled turned out to be harder than I remembered.  The problem was in reinserting the valve-rocker shaft.  Eventually I removed the hydraulic lifters and emptied the oil out of them but I don't recall needing to do that last time.  The oil forms an air-tight seal that makes the push rods hard to compress.  It is pretty trivial to remove the lifters with a hooked wire and empty them beforehand.

I will replace my oil return hoses with Gates 361970 Power Steering hose (2' for $14.71) and Mikalor 4 x 19mm W1 spring clamps (pack of 4, $16) (pic).  My 700-hour hoses were hard and the screw clamps ate into them and probably allowed leaks.  H/T to hGerhardt  at VansAirforce.

Maybe you know this but cylinders can be removed with the pistons still installed by carefully working the cylinder out to expose the piston pin which is usually an easy slide-out fit, however if you pull the cylinder 1/8" too far out, the oil ring will pop out of its groove.   Also, it is easier to install the piston and rings on the bench and leave the piston-pin hole exposed.  It's pretty much a one-man job to reinstall the cylinder after that.

For removing valves, say, to ream the valve guide, the Valve Wizard tool worked quite well.   https://valvewizard.com/     The disavantage is there are separate styles for the parallel-valve and angle-valve engines.   A lever-type tool might work as well.  It is a little cheaper and works on both engine versions (I suppose) but I have not tried one   https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/compressor.php

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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8 hours ago, Kent Ashton said:

Maybe you know this but cylinders can be removed with the pistons still installed by carefully working the cylinder out to expose the piston pin which is usually an easy slide-out fit...

When it's new, sure. I helped Mike M. do a field cylinder replacement when he had a cylinder die due to ring failure. He landed in Madera, IIRC, and we flew up there in the COZY with a new cylinder and a bunch of tools. We got the cylinder to the point you suggest, where the pin was JUST clear of the bottom of the cylinder, but it did NOT want to come loose from the piston. Had maybe 1200 - 1500 hours on it, I think. We beat the crap out of it with a hammer and punch, but it wasn't going anywhere. We ended up scrounging some wood, threaded rod, nuts, and I don't remember what else from stuff we found laying around to make a pin puller, and with much effort, pressed the pin out. The brand new one slid in like butter, so we knew the small rod-end was fine.

Anyway, yeah, sometimes :-).

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Saw this idea from Mike Busch for inspecting Lycoming cam and lifters with a borescope through the oil drain hole (pic 1).  Seems like that might work.  I remembered someone saying to go in through the oil filler hole but that does not seem practical. given where the oil filler enters the case  https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2019/march/pilot/savvy-aviator-powerplant-resurrection

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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The Mikalor clamps for the oil return hoses that I ordered from the UK seemed rather expensive (4 clamps for $17) so I thought these Hillman versions might do the job (12 for $10).  Sure enough, they are thinner metal.  😞   Order the Mikalors.

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-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Very interested as to how they work out for you - that pesky return line drip is quite common with the regular clamps!  What hoses are you going with - the Lycoming - or the Mil 6000-6 which is supposed to be "better" somehow. (I know it is about 1/3 the cost!)

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Just talking to a friend about nose strut installation.  Get your strut installation perfectly vertical.  If the strut has a bit of angle to one side, it will cause the castoring nosewheel to castor over to one side like trying to push a shopping-cart on its side.  When I flew F-4s, there was an accident in the New Orleans ANG where an F-4 blew a tire and ran off the runway.  The Dash 1 cautioned to use the hydraulic nosegear steering with a blown tire.  We had always assumed it was because the drag of the blown tire could pull the airplane to one side.  

A smart young engineer-pilot on the accident board determined that the drag of a blown tire was minimal but lowering the wing on that side was enough to make the castoring nosewheel turn the airplane off the runway.  I could be counteracted if the pilot engaged the hydraulic nosewheel steering but the pilot of the accident airplane had released the nosegear steering a couple of times to lower the hook and drop the drag chute.  Each time he released the nosegear steering and the castoring nosewheel made the aircraft jump toward the grass, as proven by tire marks on the runway.  These airplanes had been flying 40 years but no one had appreciated the dynamics.  !
 

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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The Mikalor 4 X 19 W1 spring clamps seem to be the perfect fit with the Gates 361970 power steering hose.

I thought I would try an auto oil filter.  Some folks recommended Napa 1515,  I bought a Napa 41515 which is a better filter with anti-drainback valve but it did not work with my B&C oil filter adapter.  The Napa filter threads project out further than Champion/Tempest threads and the filter bottoms on the B&C adaptor before the rubber gasket is compressed.

If somebody knows a compatible auto filter for the B&C adaptor . . ..

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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Cylinders are re-ringed and installed.  I used part of a break-in schedule from engine-man Mahlon_R on the Van's list  (1) run at 800 rpm for 3 mins, cool until you can hold your hand on the cylinder 3-5 seconds, (2) run at 1000 rpm for 3 minutes, cool, (3) run at 1200 rpm for 3 mins, cool.  Then I just went out and flew for an hour.  Surprisingly, the cylinders did not get that hot--about 375F--but it is a nice fall day here.  We'll see how they do in another 20-25 hours.

Always looking for a better way to do baffles.  Pic 1 is what I had before but it is fiddly to make and install.  Pics 2 is a new idea, pretty easy to make and install.  The outside wraps pull the center wraps tight and the small white piece made from soft aluminum flashing seals the irregularity on the case .  Seal remaining cracks with silicone sealant.  Below is a drawing (pic 3) and one of the halves shown on a cylinder.

(pic 5) I have made these exhaust seals before out of round stove-door fiberglass cord liberally slathered with RTV and formed around scrap exhaust pipe.  They last a long time.  I cut this one to fit over the installed exhausts and looped .025 safety wire through it to hold it in shape. 

A few more pics here https://www.canardzone.com/forums/topic/18661-kents-long-ez-project/?do=findComment&comment=61694IMG_0239.JPG

 

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Edited by Kent Ashton

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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congrats on getting back in the air - drive it hard to get best ring seat chance.  they say they "seat" when the temps drop 10-20 degrees.  Sometimes that happens in 15 min - sometimes in 15 hours...

On the cooling - with bottom up cooling - would it not make sense to shroud MORE of the top to keep the air that is coming up from the bottom "attached" to the fins?  It looks like once the warm air get past the baffles - the "easy" route is out the back (leaving that top center section to get pretty toasty...)  

 

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10 hours ago, mquinn6 said:

On the cooling - with bottom up cooling - would it not make sense to shroud MORE of the top to keep the air that is coming up from the bottom "attached" to the fins?  It looks like once the warm air get past the baffles - the "easy" route is out the back (leaving that top center section to get pretty toasty...)

My upper baffles near the head were smaller than I intended but the temps were pretty even with the other cylinders.  I am satisfied with the wraps around the lower barrels.  But yeah, I think you want to force all the air to go through the fins.  I suppose it is a balance between shrouding the cylinders too much and restricting flow-thru, or small baffles that let the air spill out of the top without passing through the top fins. 

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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