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7 minutes ago, Royal said:

Say you had the outside skins with the spar made in  5 sections, nose cone in 2, body in 2, canards in 2 and the alerions and small parts can be left for them to build. 

I did notice while putting them in CAD and mirroring the other side that it wasn't perfectly symmetrical. Is that something you have found on the open-ez? 

There is a very small market for the canards, getting smaller from lower pilot numbers, a troubled economy, and the expense of flying.  If you wanted to do it for yourself, for fun, that's one thing but I wouldn't expect to find a lot of people seriously interested in buying kits.  Search for "A-Solution" in my "Sales I've seen" thread.  Tons of work came to nothing (so far).  After all, the airplane IS pretty simple to build from plans.  Berkut, a full kit, was not a very successful business.  Aerocad is still around but does not do much.  I see lots of Velocity kits being sold as projects.  Revelaero (recent canard-like kits) seems inactive.  Yeah, Vans does great but that's Vans.

Generally, millimeter precision is not required.  The only asymmetry I noticed building the EZ was in mounting the rudders [crooked] which was my fault and I discussed in this thread.  There is a better way to align them than in the plans, IMO.  In fact, I think I had one wing a couple inches longer than the other but it didn't make any difference.


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I think more people don't built them because you do have to build everything and it seems daunting to a non-builder of things. I'm sure they are easy to build but for the people that started and then sold half finished kits would say otherwise. 

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Just got done doing an extended nose using my CNC router to cut all the internal structure using tab and slot construction. It is very rewarding having everything square and true.

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Jason-

Post some photos of what you've got going.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, jridge said:

Jason-  Post some photos of what you've got going.

Yes but start a new thread.    🙂   Just reading this Mooney accident--engine failure in flight   http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2020/06/loss-of-engine-power-total-mooney-m20k.html 

The Continental engine was overhauled at 2185 hrs, 255 hours later it went south.  What is interesting is that the overhauler used silk thread where silk thread is not called for (red area in pic 1).  The report says remnants of the thread can be seen around the bolt hole (pic 2).  The silk thread did not allow the through-bolts to be torqued properly.  

In a related problem, I know that Lycoming overhaulers that used RTV where the cylinders mount on the case can cause the cylinder bolt torque to relax and then a cylinder gets loose (or comes off!).   Be careful.

-------------------------

Then there is this one--a Cirrus--where the pilot appears to have used fuel pump high boost for takeoff--a no no with that engine.  It caused the engine to quit, he pulled the parachute below 200' and died.  Pictures show the airplane in the middle of big clear field.   http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2020/06/loss-of-engine-power-total-cirrus-sr22t.html   A while back I did a "return-to-the-field" exercise in the Cozy.   It's a little uncomfortable to chop power at low altitude but it was very instructive as to what options I might have for an engine failure on takeoff leg.  Below 400', dicey.  At 500' agl pretty doable.   I am not suggesting this Cirrus fellow should have tried to return to the field.  It appears a controlled landing in the field would have let him live.  We have to read these accidents and play them over in our minds--reinforce them with some flying practice so when the time ever comes, we can say "I have been here before and ____ is my best option."

KathrynsReport.jpg

KathrynsReport-1.jpg

Edited by Kent Ashton

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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$12,000 will get you a Honda fit engine ready to drop in. Brand new engine is $5,000 from the dealer. 

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This posted today on the Cozy list (pic).   These newsletters are a must-have for EZ owners and builders--filled with hundreds of ideas on building and owning EZs compiled by Terry Schubert over years and years.  There is a follow-on organization with a continuation of the newsletter    https://canardowners.com/content.aspx?page_id=9&club_id=391558 and    https://www.facebook.com/centralstatesassociation but I do not see that they make the old newsletters available.    Well worth the bucks if you are new to EZs.

34-flash drive advert.jpg


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I'm hoping the digital version of the CSA newletters will contain photos that are clearer to view than the printed copies.

Not that many are building Long EZ's anymore, but I wish someone would rescan the old Canard Pusher newsletters at a better resolution.   I'm working from the low resolution digital versions posted on the web and many of the photos in the newsletters are nearly worthless.

Jeff

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Just reading this Mooney crash right after takeoff.  Foggy day, 600 and 3/4 mile viz, older pilot (75). The day before he asked another pilot about instrument departures from RW 29.  Next day, he told ATC he would take off from RW 29.  He announced taxi to RW 29 and that he was taking-off from RW29, however, he was actually using RW 11.  A helpful observer told him "Runway 11" on the freq as he made his initial call to ATC.  Pilot said "Thanks for the help" but never contacted ATC and flew into the ground after about 180 degrees of turn.

http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2020/07/loss-of-control-in-flight-mooney-m20j.html

https://goo.gl/maps/BWCzC58DCtk6WjVq8

I feel for the guy.  Been there myself in cases where your mind is quite certain of your present situation but the actual situation is much different.  There is a second for the mind to grasp the new understanding and reorient.  The flight path indicates he knew he needed to turn around.  I imagine he was shuffling papers or fingering instrument departure pages and just did not keep track of the airplane.  I has been my habit at strange fields to know the first heading after takeoff and visualize which direction it will take me.  Maybe if this pilot had looked out the window and thought "My first heading is 290 and 290 is . . . wait!?  Behind me?"  

BTW, I recommend this guy who does a great job of discussing recent accidents like the Pakistani airliner that did a gear-up touch-and-go recently (then crashed)

 

Edited by Kent Ashton

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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I always make a habit of checking the compass once I line up. Obviously it should be close to the runway number, or something is amiss, in which case it is time to abort or delay the take-off until whatever is resolved.


Aerocanard (modified) SN:ACPB-0226 (Chapter 8)

Canardspeed.com (my build log and more; usually lags behind actual progress)
Flight simulator (X-plane) flight model master: X-Aerodynamics

(GMT+12)

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Here's another one that makes you just shake your head.  Tri-pacer had not flown since 1996.  The AI that signed off the the annual did not supervise the owner's inspection.  The 68 year old pilot and his passenger on their way to get a Wt & Bal at another airport landed in a cornfield when the engine failed.  Inspection found an ancient, leaking fuel line, fuel valve that only opened 25%, debris in the gascolator, and a large insect nest in the engine compartment.  Maybe the owner didn't want to disturb the wasps.  🙂

http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2020/07/piper-pa-22-150-tri-pacer-n7208d.html


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

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