Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I took Mr. Z's advice and cut and epoxied my landing brake to take the warp out of the forward edges discussed here   https://www.canardzone.com/forums/topic/18661-kents-long-ez-project/?do=findComment&comment=64376.  Seems to work.  Two layers of BID used.  

Looking forward to testing this annular slot antenna with my transponder.  Brass (.012") came from McMaster, black support from a scrap modem case (ABS plastic), plan from Del Shier who scaled it for the transponder/ADSB range.  He says it should give a 4-6db gain over a quarter-wave antenna

 

IMG_1735.jpg

IMG_1737.jpg

IMG_1736.jpg

tranant978_small.jpeg


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came across this good writeup on keeping the interior of the engine dry to prevent rust.  http://www.longezpush.com/engine-dehydrator/      If you can keep the interior relative humidity below about 40%, the steel won't rust (pic).  I have made these from an ammo can but almost any container will work.  Circulate the air through the oil filler and the breather tube.  I have also found the dessicant gets oily on an engine that has run.   These days I blow the oily moisture out of the engine for 30 seconds with an air mattress pump, then hook up the dehydrator.  Plug the exhausts.  Not much you can do about open intake valves but I doubt that cylinder rust is as big a problem and cam/lifter rust.

corrosion_prevention_chart.jpg


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The landing brake repair made it all nice and smooth on the bottom.

I flew in the Cozy with an old friend who has bought an EZ and wanted some time.  Looking in my log books, I had flown him in 1999 before he became a pilot.  I think he has about 150 hours in Cessnas now.    He did pretty well.  After a bunch of landings the only thing I was concerned about was the "falling leaf":  get slow approaching the overrun, rounding-out early and high, reluctant to let the airplane land.    That's tough on my landing gear.

When the canard is maxed out (about 63-65 KIAS in my airplane), there is nothing left to arrest a sink rate, hence the name "falling leaf".  I like it much better when a pilot maintains final approach speed (75 for me) until the landing is assured but continues his descent to the numbers.  The final approach speed will decrease a little but there will be adequate speed left to break the descent and round-out just above the runway surface.  I would rather have a guy do an incomplete roundout and land a bit hard than drop it in from a high round-out and try to catch it before it prangs.  In my airplane, he had to look all the way across the cockpit to see the speed but still . . .

Fortunuately it was an almost calm day.  We talked about flying patterns in a crosswind.  If a base turn takes 25 seconds and you have 20 knots of crosswind, the wind will move the airplane 843 feet downwind during the base turn (1.68 fps * 25 * 20 = 843) so it is important to start the base turn aiming for an imaginary runway 843 feet upwind.  As the base turn continues, you bring the imaginary runway closer to the actual runway.   If you don't think of that, you'll have an angling final or overshot final and you can't figure out why.  It is the same for 20 knots of headwind: you would begin your base flying to an imaginary aimpoint 843' down the runway (upwind).  This is particularly important in engine-out landings where failing to take the winds into account is one of the many errors that will cause you to land short or long.

For me, a Cozy pilot is proficient when he can regularly reduce the power to idle on downwind and land on the numbers or slightly beyond without touching the power again.

  • Like 1

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny story:  I had a buddy with a new-to-him Cozy III that decided one day to fly out to this high altitude (5737' MSL) Arizona airport with his lady friend   http://www.airnav.com/airport/KSJN

After a mexican lunch, it was summer and the temperature was warmer.  The winds slightly favored the shorter 3400' runway rather than the longer 5300' runway so my friend automatically chose the (shorter) runway.  Also my sea-level dwelling buddy did not think about leaning to peak power before takeoff.   He had taken on enough fuel and tamales to get back to California and had his lady in the left seat which delays rotation.  As a result of all this, he barely got airborne before the end and scared the heck out of himself.  

The long runway was 1622 feet wide.  The shorter runway 1037' wide.  I don't think the wind was a significant crosswind for the wide runway but if it had been, he could have used the canard-airplane strategy of lining up on the upwind side of the runway and beginning the takeoff roll angled away from the crosswind.  As the airplane accelerates, any crosswind weathervanes the airplane to align it with the runway.   This allows you (maybe) to use less brake early in the takeoff and by the time the rudders become effective you may be aligned with the runway.   Of course, we do not have the tractor-airplane advantage of a prop blast on the rudders to give us rudder authority early on takeoff.  Using brakes to control runway alignment in a canard airplane will significantly increase the takeoff roll.

But IMO the big error was forgetting to lean to peak power.  At 5737' MSL on 85 deg F day,  the density altitude could be as much as 8800'     http://www.pilotfriend.com/pilot_resources/density.htm      A carbed engine leaned to peak power is only putting out maybe 75-70% power at that density altitude and at full rich, it was probably putting out much less than that.   Fun, huh?


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2020 at 11:02 AM, Kent Ashton said:

The long runway was 1622 feet wide.  The shorter runway 1037' wide.

These are some impressively wide runways! Maybe they do things differently out in Arizona?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, Ron Springer said:

These are some impressively wide runways! Maybe they do things differently out in Arizona?

Wait, I got that wrong.  They are a more-normal 60' and 75' wide.   I was reading the length in meters.  :-(  

The widest runway I have heard of was at McDill AFB (Tampa) which was about 360' wide but has since been resurfaced.

Edited by Kent Ashton

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-750 hrs, Long-EZ-85 hrs and sold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grant County airport at Moses Lake Washington has five runways.

The longest is 13,500' (14L/32R) and the  shortest (14R/32L) is 2936'.

The entire airport is 7.3 square miles.

It was a training base for the Army Air Corp in WWII

Use is mainly general aviation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


The Canard Zone

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information