Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tdale4

electric in-flight adjustable prop?

Recommended Posts

Is anyone planning on using a Mazda rotary engine with an electrical in-flight adjustable prop....like the IVO model?

 

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think some are, but are afraid to speak because of problems that have ocurred with ivo props on 4 cylender AC engines, and they don't want to be told how stupid they are.

 

enjoy the build

 

dust

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to use a CS prop, but I'm hoping a year or so from now the other shoe will drop (instead of other airplanes) and there will have been advancement made in the semi-non-FAA-certified CS prop arena.

 

I'd like to think that the term "experimental", referring to the Cozy, is just a technicality. When it comes to a propeller (air slicing device), I want someone else to get all the experimenting out of the way before I lash it to my backside and point myself in harm's way (anywhere from up is down). There is enough trouble with known good prop systems.

 

I am keeping an eye out for changes though. CS propeller equipment would complete the rotary ensemble, especially if it is as light as they say it is...

If you change your mind, it's one of the last things to do and a retrofit is not that big of a deal...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul Lamar and a few others from the ACRE list have been working on an adjustable prop design. I think they have the prototype ready for testing on the dyno.

 

It's taking a long time, but it might bear fruit eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble with CS props on pushers is the extra loads on the hub and blade base. Nobody knows for sure just HOW much more stressful it is, and it probably varies substantially from one plane to another. ALL CS props are designed for tractors, and the manufacturers who have what they feel is a stout enough design allow it to be used on pushers. I'm afraid I'll have to stay with fixed pitch for the forseeable future. Besides, I couldn't afford a CS prop even if I had a tractor.:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Variable pitch has been used by Uli Wolters in Germany where a lot of nice props are being manufactured.

Hope this works 1. time tried

Helgeusers.sisna.com/dbmonk/nl24.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you answerred my question for those who need an elec prop, i have already decided on an oil cs mt prop, just didn't realize that they had elec also

 

enjoy the build

 

dust

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding is that there some laminated wood props that are "semi-constant speed". In other words, they flex to kinda sorta maintain a narrow speed range. Maybe this is something to look at?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prince Prop did this a little. This was the best fixed pitch prop I had on my EZ, that is until an exhaust valve took off the outer 8 inches on one blade.

 

Waiter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

until an exhaust valve took off the outer 8 inches on one blade.

 

Waiter

:yikes: That got to hurt! Where you in mid air at the time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lycoming running on 3 cylinders sure do shake, bad.

 

Cruising along at 5500 ft, Pop, mild vibration, then BANG.

 

Violent shaking, Pulled the power back to a very rough idle. Declared an emergency with Bay Approach (San Francisco), Advised them I had enough altitude to dead stick to Reid Hillview Airport (about 4 miles away). Turned the fuel valve OFF.

 

High overhead approach for a high key entry, made it at about 2,500 ft. Entered low key right on the money at 1,000 ft, Continued the turn to base, check gear down, around to final. Using the speed brake for energy. Landed a little long. Had enough energy on the roll out to clear the runway.

 

Stopped the plane, breathed again, Then I started shaking more violently then the plane.

 

Training pays off

 

POSTMORTEM - Big chunk missing out of the cylinder. Evidently when the valve broke, it rattled around inside the cylinder,for a couple milliseconds, punched a hole in the top of the cylinder, then went out through the exhaust pipe. The timing was absolutely perfect, as the prop blade and the valve collided. The valve won, taking off the outer 8 inches of the blade.

 

Damn that was a good prop. :sad:

 

Waiter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lycoming running on 3 cylinders sure do shake, bad.

 

Cruising along at 5500 ft, Pop, mild vibration, then BANG.

 

Violent shaking, Pulled the power back to a very rough idle. Declared an emergency with Bay Approach (San Francisco), Advised them I had enough altitude to dead stick to Reid Hillview Airport (about 4 miles away). Turned the fuel valve OFF.

 

High overhead approach for a high key entry, made it at about 2,500 ft. Entered low key right on the money at 1,000 ft, Continued the turn to base, check gear down, around to final. Using the speed brake for energy. Landed a little long. Had enough energy on the roll out to clear the runway.

 

Stopped the plane, breathed again, Then I started shaking more violently then the plane.

 

Training pays off

 

POSTMORTEM - Big chunk missing out of the cylinder. Evidently when the valve broke, it rattled around inside the cylinder,for a couple milliseconds, punched a hole in the top of the cylinder, then went out through the exhaust pipe. The timing was absolutely perfect, as the prop blade and the valve collided. The valve won, taking off the outer 8 inches of the blade.

 

Damn that was a good prop. :sad:

 

Waiter

 

POS Lycoming......shoulda had a rotary :P <ducking>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lycoming running on 3 cylinders sure do shake, bad.

I think we should qualify this -- a Lycoming running on 3.5 physical cylinders will vibrate, BUT a Lycoming firing on 3 of 4 cylinders will not vibrate.

 

I just wanted to be clear that a Lycoming with a dead cylinder will just be a less powerful engine. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 3 cylinder Lycoming, with 8 inches missing off a prop blade, will shake so bad, you'll wonder how it even stays on the airplane. :scared:

 

Waiter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:scared:

No doubt that has to be on the top 10 scary list.

 

What do you mean by "Using the speed brake for energy."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we should qualify this -- a Lycoming running on 3.5 physical cylinders will vibrate, BUT a Lycoming firing on 3 of 4 cylinders will not vibrate.

 

I just wanted to be clear that a Lycoming with a dead cylinder will just be a less powerful engine. Correct me if I'm wrong.

That's great - the assumptions you make, when I read that, I thought he'd lost a mag, as I was thinking, 'man it would suck to lose half of your cylinders!'....

 

Brett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by "Using the speed brake for energy."

I arrived at High Key with more energy than I needed, so I use the drag device to get rid of that energy.

 

Waiter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...