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#1 flyingclay

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 10:36 AM

I have been lurking this and other sites for a long time on and off. I just purchased a cozy MKIV kit, It has plans number 49 and most everything to build a cozy airframe minus epoxy, engine and avionics. I currently fly a Dragonfly and am looking forward to building and flying the cozy. I have been interested in this design for years and am finally going to build it. I need to build my table and a place in the hanger to work on the plane (plane parts) I know that my plans are out of date and am thinking of buying a more recent copy to build from and register it a s number 49.I live in Mankato MN and it is too cold to start working on epoxy so I am now in the process of reading everything I can to get started but any advice would be very appreciated. I am planning on visiting Oshkosh this summer and hopefully getting some ideas about building it so it will be fast and light and have the comforts of a modern plane, cozy girl strakes, forward canopy, and anything else I can learn. I have done some composite work and am nervous about it because  my family will have their butts in the plane and I want it to be safe.  Hoping to get a chance to meet everyone and looking froward to this new chapter (pun intended) in my life.



#2 Kent Ashton

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 04:32 PM

HI, I don't think you need to worry about building a safe airplane.  All the initial parts--bulkhead and sides--are so low-stress that klutzy epoxy work there is not going to hurt anything.  My first parts were too dry from over-squeegeeing.  I finally figured that out from examining them with a jeweler's loupe.

 

There are many good builder sites these days that show details.  A Google Images search will find them or just ask and we will suggest some.  

 

Plans #49--that's an old one.  I have #150.  Perhaps this plans update page will be enough and you won't have to buy new plans.

http://www.cozybuild...IV_correct.html


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-650 hrs, Long-EZ-55 hrs


#3 flyingclay

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 08:18 PM

I checked out the page, thanks for the link. I am looking forward to the education and building. Are there any builders or fliers near Mankato MN? I have been researching for some time and have read a lot of builder logs on the web. is there anything I should be aware of in the first stages that will help in the long run? Thanks again for the reply.



#4 Marc Zeitlin

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 12:22 AM

I checked out the page, thanks for the link. I am looking forward to the education and building. Are there any builders or fliers near Mankato MN? I have been researching for some time and have read a lot of builder logs on the web. is there anything I should be aware of in the first stages that will help in the long run? Thanks again for the reply.


Join the COZY mailing list:
 
http://www.cozybuilders.org/mail_list/
 
and get access to the builder/flyer database, which you can search for people near you (and there are a few). Also get access to a wealth of COZY knowledge 24/7.
 
Read the FAQ and all the newsletters.

#5 Kent Ashton

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 08:11 AM

Are there any builders or fliers near Mankato MN? . . . is there anything I should be aware of in the first stages that will help in the long run? Thanks again for the reply.

 
Likely the EAA chapter near you or other Minnesota chapters will know.  The chapter phone nos. are found via the EAA website.
 
I just noticed a project for sale in Texas completed through Chapter 10.  Those are usually good value, usually built carefully, and will give you a nice jump-start.  See Barnstormers.com

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-650 hrs, Long-EZ-55 hrs


#6 flyingclay

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:16 AM

Thanks for the advice. I saw that listing for the cozy on barnstormers, I have all the materials to build it except the epoxy and I want to build it all. I am looking forward to the experience and trying to save money. Ill add myself to the list and see who is around that I can find out information and check out some planes locally. I am going to attend Oshkosh again this year, it has been about 5 years since my last visit. It happens on my anniversary, what pilot would get married during Oshkosh, and she has given me the OK. It is still too cold to do anything towards the build here in MN so I have been studying the plans and scouring the inter webs in search of all those who have come before me. It has been great seeing all the info that builders and fliers have loaded info to the internet and all of the progress and mistakes that were made and corrected so that us newbies won't have to make (hopefully). Ill keep checking back and again thanks to all for the information.



#7 flyingclay

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 03:14 PM

I just got my first shipment of MGS epoxy and it is still too cold here to do any glass work. I have Made two tables, 42X72". I have build my center spar jig, turtleback jig, longeron and fuselage side jig, cut out the bulkheads for ch.4 and the fuselage sides, cut out the foam for the center spar, made the hard points for the center spar. I have been reading everything I can find as to not make any mistakes but I probably will anyway. I hope I am not moving too far ahead and missing something, but I want to be able to start glassing as much as possible as soon as it warms up a bit. I have a question about the hard points in the center spar. Is it better to anodize these or to alodine them? I can do either but would have to order the alodine and can do my own anodizing as I already have the stuff to do this. Do I need to sand them after anodizing before glassing over in the spar? I know I have time before I get to this point but I can do this while waiting for warmth. Thanks again for all the help.



#8 Kent Ashton

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 07:39 PM

It probably doesn't matter because they'll be embedded in the structure. Not as exposed as the Varieze wing fittings which can get very corroded. People have lots of opinions. I just scratched them up, cleaned them and used them. Maybe today i would alodyne them. Or spray with an etch primer and epoxy paint.

Are you on the cozybuilders list? You can do a search in the archives. Not the first one to ask this question

-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-650 hrs, Long-EZ-55 hrs


#9 flyingclay

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 09:31 PM

Kent, Thanks for the info, I read about the vari EZ but didn't know that they were exposed. and the fact that we are drilling through them would not be protected in the hole but I thought I should do something. This makes me feel more at ease. I talked with Mark about the cozy builders list but have not accessed it yet.



#10 Kent Ashton

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 09:04 AM

I never built a Vari but I believe the wing fittings were 2024 alloy which is more corrosion-sensitive than, say, 6061, and the way they were installed, water and dew could collect above the fittings and seep between the laminate and the aluminum.

 

I put drains in my Cozy wing bolt pockets that run from top pocket to bottom pocket and would drain water that finds its way into the pockets and might seep into the bolts and the fittings we are talking about.  The cover on the bottom pocket has a little drain hole, too.  It's probably best to seal the top pocket (note to self!) to keep rain and wash-water out of the pockets.   It seemed like a good idea, anyway.  :-)  

 

Most of the corrosion I worry about is inside the engine.  


-Kent
Cozy IV N13AM-650 hrs, Long-EZ-55 hrs


#11 Andrew Anunson

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 09:47 AM

When you anodize, you change the fatigue characteristics of the aluminum.  I would not anodize anything structural or in the control system unless you include anodizing in the re-design of the parts that you anodize.

 

Alodining does not change the fatigue characteristics of the aluminum.  

 

Early on in my build, I made a decision to alodine every aluminum part that was going to get buried in the airplane... firewall mount hardpoints, landing gear hardpoints, hidden rudder belhorns, nosegear hardpoints... on and on.  So far, I've only used 1.5 bottles of each part of the alodine kit.  They are available at PPG auto paint stores, some Napa stores, and some car quest stores as well as aircraft spruce.

 

No, you don't sand the parts after you alodine them... you'll sand off the alodine coating.

I use scotch brite to clean them up, and do what the plans say (if it says sand the parts, then I sand the parts).

 

Many Rutan planes were built with no alodining, and have not had any problems.  


Andrew Anunson
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#12 flyingclay

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:20 AM

Does this also include not anodizing hard points? The fact that they are in compression I would think that the fatigue would not be a problem. I guess I will just alodine the parts, it seems like the safest and most protective for the aluminum parts in our plastic planes. I was hoping to add some flash to parts with nice colors after anodizing but I do not want to risk the loss of strength. I just glassed landing gear hard points last night and planning on cutting them out today. I had to do the glass in the basement because it is still cold here in MN and there might be snow. I live in the wrong place.



#13 TMann

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 12:36 PM

I had to do the glass in the basement because it is still cold here in MN and there might be snow. I live in the wrong place.

Les, cover the part with plastic and throw an electric blanket over it. That will keep it toasty.

When I did my CS Spar & Canard I made a long narrow box out of 2" foam from Home Depot Aviation. After covering with an electric blanket & the box, I was getting cure temperatures in excess of 100F.


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#14 flyingclay

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 04:26 PM

Les, cover the part with plastic and throw an electric blanket over it. That will keep it toasty.

When I did my CS Spar & Canard I made a long narrow box out of 2" foam from Home Depot Aviation. After covering with an electric blanket & the box, I was getting cure temperatures in excess of 100F.

 

That is perfect. I used an electric blanket when I made my concrete countertops, Why didn't I think of that. This list is the best. Now I can start doing some actual layups. Thanks for the idea, I will be using this one soon.



#15 Andrew Anunson

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 12:58 PM

Does this also include not anodizing hard points? The fact that they are in compression I would think that the fatigue would not be a problem. I guess I will just alodine the parts,

I don't know about anodizing hard points... and like you said, how could fatigue be a problem with hard points?  I don't know.  The Cozy plans don't even tell us to alodine the engine mount hardpoints... they say to cover the aluminum with epoxy.

 

Your anodzing may be fine for those parts.  Anytime I diverge from the plans or from what is generally accepted, I learn all the details first.  So, if you anodize, make certain its ok.


Andrew Anunson
I work underground and I play in the sky... no problem

#16 Jon Matcho

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 10:28 AM

I would not anodize anything remotely structural, which includes hardpoints.

I like the Cozy Girrrl hardpoints (alodined):

http://www.cozygirrr...s_cozy_mkiv.htm

Just my 2 cents...

Jon Matcho :busy:
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www.canardzone.com/members/JonMatcho (I know, it's broken... for now)


#17 flyingclay

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 08:40 PM

I am going to alodine. I have just cut out the hard points for the landing gear and 5 min epoxied the front bulkheads. I am hoping to glass on friday if the weather cooperates. I have made the forming jigs for carving the center spar and for contouring the fuselage sides. I have all the wood part for setting up the wings and canard. I am getting close to not having to do any more wood work. I am hoping to be a glassing fool for the summer.



#18 Jon Matcho

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 10:47 PM

I am hoping to be a glassing fool for the summer.


Slow and steady... you sound like you're making a lot of progress!

Jon Matcho :busy:
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Building Cozy Mark VI+ (widened rear)
www.canardzone.com/members/JonMatcho (I know, it's broken... for now)


#19 flyingclay

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 06:24 AM

I keep working on it every day. I just finished my last teaching class last night and now I am off for the summer and have time to get this done. I will be gone for the month of June so I need to get as much done before and after. It is finally getting warm and with the electric blanket I should be able to get a lot of fiberglass work done. I have all almost all of the foam and fiberglass  for the airframe, now I just need to get it put together. I have an old sticky stuff dispenser that I need to convert to MGS epoxy ratio, but also have pumps and a scale to get me by until I can get the right ratio. If anybody has done this with a non adjustable pump I would greatly appreciate any help or photos of the conversion other wise It will be trial and error and it usually takes longer that way. Thanks again for all the great ideas and help.

 

Les



#20 Jon Matcho

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 06:57 AM

This topic brings out a lot of opinions, but I started measuring epoxy by using only a scale and cups and found that has been ideal.  If I need more time I just use the slow hardener.

 

Make sure you test the heck out of the pump before committing it for use on parts.  Save the cups you used so you can perform the "scratch test" to verify right mixture and curing of your parts.  If a cup never cures (does not allow you to make a scratch in the epoxy, but just mushes) then you'll need to remake the part.


Jon Matcho :busy:
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Building Cozy Mark VI+ (widened rear)
www.canardzone.com/members/JonMatcho (I know, it's broken... for now)





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